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Thursday, March 10
 

07:44 GMT

Registration and Coffee
Thursday March 10, 2016 07:44 - 09:30 GMT
Venue

09:30 GMT

Opening Address from Lord Addington and Dr Kate Saunders
Opening Address from BDA President Lord Addington and  BDA CEO Dr Kate Saunders 


Thursday March 10, 2016 09:30 - 09:45 GMT
Auditorium

09:30 GMT

Could Morphological Knowledge Improve Literacy in Dyslexic Children?
Abstract: We know that most children with dyslexia show particular difficulties with processingspeech sounds (phonology). This project investigates how much children use information aboutthe internal structure of words (morphology) to compensate for these difficulties. Morphologyrefers to the parts of words that carry meaning, for example, the word ‘boys’ has twomorphemes – ‘boy’ and ‘s’, which indicates a plural.Knowledge of a word’s morphemes can help us to read and write unusual words such as ‘health’(which contains ‘heal’) and ‘sign’ (which shares a morpheme with signal and signature). It canalso act as a powerful vocabulary-learning tool. Some researchers have argued that children withdyslexia could use morphology to help overcome their weaknesses in phonology, while othershave argued that morphological awareness is a further weakness in dyslexia.I present a thorough investigation of both morphological awareness and use of morphologicalstrategies in literacy in children with dyslexia, asking to what extent children with dyslexia usethese strategies and whether those who do use them show better long-term progress.

Chair
Keynote
PJ

Professor Julia Carroll,

Julia Carroll joined Coventry University in September 2014 as a Reader in ChildDevelopment and Education. Prior to that she had been an Associate Professor at the Universityof Warwick, having joined there in 2004. She completed her DPhil in York in 2001 and stayed onto do a postdoctoral... Read More →


Thursday March 10, 2016 09:30 - 10:30 GMT
Auditorium

10:30 GMT

Developmental Growth in Phonological Skills: Differences between Children with and without Dyslexia
Limited Capacity full
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Developmental growth in phonological skills:Differences between children with and withoutdyslexiaJanin BrandenburgGerman Institute for International EducationalResearch (DIPF), Germanybrandenburg@dipf.deCoauthors: Julia Klesczewski (Goethe University,Germany), Anne Fischbach (DIPF, Germany),Gerhard Büttner (Goethe University, Germany),Marcus Hasselhorn (DIPF, Germany)Dyslexia is associated with deficits inphonological processing (PP). Yet, how thesechildren progress in phonological skills duringmiddle childhood is still at issue. Thus, thisstudy examined the development of PP inchildren with dyslexia. Their developmentalcourse may either reflect a developmental lagor deficit when compared to peers. The formermodel suggests that children with dyslexialag behind their peers primarily in the rateat which cognitive skills progress. The lattermodel suggests that group differences aredevelopmentally stable or may increase overtime (Matthew effect).In total, 109 children with dyslexia (readingand/or spelling: T-score < 40; nonverbal IQ> 85) and 100 normally achieving children(reading and spelling: T-score > 45; nonverbalIQ > 85) participated in this study. Phonologicalprocessing, that is phonological awareness(PA), rapid automatized naming (RAN), andphonological short-term memory (PSTM), wasassessed once a year from Grade 3 to Grade 5.Data was analyzed with latent difference scoremodelling in Mplus. Analyses revealed 4 findings:1) Children with dyslexia performed significantlylower than the CG on all phonological skills inGrade 3. 2) Developmental growth in PA wasstable across groups and testing wave, which isin line with a developmental deficit model. 3) Incontrast, developmental differences in RAN werebest described by a developmental lag model, aschildren with dyslexia caught up with the CG by

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 10:30 - 10:48 GMT
Breakout Room 3

10:30 GMT

Dyslexia and Mental Health: An Investigation of Emotional Coping Strategie
Limited Capacity seats available

This research was conducted in preparation to write a book on ‘Dyslexia and Success’. It aims to investigate the traits and coping strategies in everyday successful dyslexics using an interview study of 20+ dyslexic (mixed gender, 18-65yrs) adults, all who identify themselves as being successful. IPA was used to analyse the results of investigative qualitative transcripts. Supportive data includes the results of an online survey of 100 dyslexics who recognise themselves as successful, looking at their motivations, coping strategies and traits. The results of the study indicate that school failure is a distinct motivation for success in the workplace, and that a supportive parent and identification of strengths in childhood are predictors for post-school success. The theory of ‘Post-traumatic growth disorder’ is used to understand successful dyslexics and questions if failure in mainstream schools is integral to post-school success. Other details: This paper is based research for the author’s new book (2017 by Jessica Kingsley Publishers).


Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 10:30 - 10:48 GMT
Breakout Room 2

10:30 GMT

Visual Processing in Indian Children with Dyslexia: an Eye-Tracking Study
Limited Capacity seats available

Visual Processing in Indian Children withDyslexia: an Eye-Tracking StudySuvarna ChintaIIIT-Hyderabadsuvarna.rekha.11@research.iiit.ac.inCo-author: Harini SampathEye movement studies provide valuable insightin cognitive processes involved in reading.However, there are no eye movement studiesin Indian languages. The E-Z reader modelpredicts that eye movements in typical readersare characterized by linear saccadic movementswith few regressions and fixation points. Studieshave shown that the preferred visual location(PVL) and optimal viewing position (OVP) tendsto be initial and centre of a word in alphabeticallanguages. In this study, we explore if thispattern holds for Indian dyslexic children. Werecorded eye movements of dyslexic (N = 18)and typically developing (N = 16) children duringthree tasks - passage reading, auditory-word andpicture identification tasks.We computed wpm, regression percentage andfirst fixation for text analysis, and first fixationduration, gaze duration and total fixation timefor word level analysis. We also conducted PVLanalysis, which yielded word specific measuresfor the OVP. Experimental design was 2(group)X 3(tasks), and in the PVL and OVP analysis weemployed 2(group) X 2(text, word) X 3(wordzone).MANOVA were computed for theseparameters. Dyslexic readers performed moreaccurately in picture identification compared toauditory- word identification task. In paragraphreading, mean fixation duration was significantly(p<0.01) higher for dyslexic (mean 12.28 + 0.98SD) compared to typical readers (mean 5.46 +2.64 SD). Eye movements in the dyslexic readerwas characterized by multiple regressions anddo not correspond to the E-Z reader model. ThePVL and OVP found to be initial and last-zoneof a word in dyslexic readers, initial and centrein typical readers. In line with this our resultssupport dominant para-foveal processing

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 10:30 - 10:52 GMT
Breakout Room 4

10:30 GMT

Practical Solutions for Teaching Pupils with Dyscalculia
Limited Capacity full
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Practical Solutions for Teaching Pupils withSpLDs, including Dyscalculia have been developed through partnershipworking with the Toolkit Working Group,Dyslexia Scotland, Education Scotland andEducation Authorities within the context ofGIRFEC and Curriculum for Excellence.The interactive resources have been developedto provide a detailed view and understanding ofhow a child or young person’s literacy skills havedeveloped. They can be used in primary andsecondary sectors and may also be beneficialfor children and young people for whom Englishis not their first language and adults. The freeresources provide;• Descriptions of the key areas involved in theacquisition of reading and writing skills• Identifying areas of difficulty• Approaches/Strategies and links to resourcesfor each key area• A Practical resource sheet/ evaluation toolto record discussion, highlight strengths,difficulties and to plan the next stepsappropriately.This seminar will highlight classroom and wholeschool approaches which support practitionersto provide a consistent approach for literacydevelopment, leading to positive outcomes andraised achievement for learners.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 10:30 - 11:15 GMT
Breakout Room 6

10:30 GMT

Teaching English (second language), Reading and Writing
Limited Capacity full
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Teaching English (second language): Readingand Writing.Nokkie HartmanRemedial Therapist, Learning Centre, Somerset

West, South Africanokkie@remedialhelp.co.za South Africa has 11 official languages, withEnglish as the most commonly spoken language.Children start with their Additional Language at7-8 years and they often battle. If the child hashad English tuition for about 1-2 years, I start byevaluating his reading and writing skills, doing afault analysis and working out an individualisedprogram. Using existing British or Americanprograms does help, but often the vocabularyand idiomatic language is hard to understand forSecond Language learners. Thinking on your feetand making use of more than one source, is thekey to success.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 10:30 - 11:15 GMT
Breakout Room 5

10:30 GMT

Visual Stress, Coloured Filters and Reading Difficulty

Ian Abbott, Wiltshire Council Special Educational Needs and Disability Service; Lisa-Marie Henderson, University of York; Bruce Evans, Institute of Optometry & Department of Optometry and Visual Science, City University; and Paul Adler, Paul Adler Optometrists

Visual Stress is a term used to describe the experience of eye strain, difficulty in focusing, headaches, and illusions of colour or movement in printed text. It remains a controversial topic, and even published literature reviews sometimes reach opposite conclusions. Some experts argue that it is a major correlate and even cause of dyslexia and others argue that it does not exist at all. This symposium considers some of the debate around Visual Stress, reviewing existing literature and presenting results from recent research.

Ian Abbott will introduce Visual Stress from an educational perspective, given the widespread use of coloured filters (overlays) and reading rulers within typical classrooms. Despite strong testimonial support from users, educators and parents/carers, awareness of Visual Stress is lacking and there is potential confusion regarding its relationship with dyslexia.

Dr Lisa Henderson will discuss recent results following a systematic review of the evidence into the use of coloured overlays and lenses to improve reading in individuals with visual stress and/or dyslexia. The review has been carried out by a multidisciplinary team spanning psychology, ophthalmology, and optometry.

Professor Bruce Evans’ presentation will take a new look at the literature to focus on colour through the prism of common sources of error in experimental design. It will be argued that research that has combined appropriate selection criteria with validated testing methods and relevant outcome variables reveals strong evidence for the existence of Visual Stress. However, Visual Stress is not a cause of dyslexia

but rather a co-occurring condition that is

present in a minority of people with dyslexia.

Finally, Paul Adler will address Overlays and Precision Tinted Lenses from the viewpoint of a practising Optometrist. His findings suggest that only 5-10% of patients benefiting from overlays will go on to use Precision Tinted Lenses, despite the large increases in reading speed he often observes. His presentation will demonstrate the importance of good vision for literacy development, especially where the individual experiences reading difficulty.

The aim of this symposium is to encourage lively debate into the fascinating topic of Visual Stress; the session will culminate in a question and answer opportunity with the panel members.


Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 10:30 - 12:00 GMT
Auditorium

10:30 GMT

Dyslexia in Adulthood: Challenges, Barriers and Enablers
Limited Capacity seats available

(In Memoriam of Professor Bob Burden)

This presentation aims to set the context for the symposium Dyslexia in adulthood: Challenges, Barriers and Enablers by providing an overview of research and practice relating to Dyslexia in adulthood. A synthesis of the existing evidence documenting the challenges encountered across a range of contexts (e.g. education. social) will be discussed to help identify barriers and enablers to success. The socio-emotional dimension will also be examined and the importance of adaptive coping strategies and resilience discussed. A cross-disciplinary literature review allowed identification of research relating to Dyslexia in adulthood. Only peer-reviewed, quantitative and qualitative papers were included and the main criteria for inclusion were that the study focused on Dyslexia in adults. A systematic search was conducted on a number of databases: EMBASE, 

PsychLIT, PsychINFO, MEDLINE, ERIC and the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI). Dyslexia impacts negatively upon self-esteem, socio-emotional well-being, relationships, education and career choice. Positive experiences concerning the identification of their dyslexia, successful intervention and support were found. The relative benefits of quantitative and qualitative methods were examined and the immense insights offered by qualitative data recognised. Future research would benefit from adopting both a longitudinal and mixed methods approach to further inform understanding of the barrier and enablers to success experienced by adults with dyslexia.


 

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 10:30 - 12:30 GMT
Breakout Room 1

10:48 GMT

An Investigation into the Prevalence of the Co-existence of Dyslexia and SelfReported Symptomology of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Higher Education Students and the Effect on Self-image and Self-esteem
Limited Capacity seats available

An investigation into the prevalence ofthe co-existence of dyslexia and selfreportedsymptomology of Attention DeficitHyperactivity Disorder in Higher Educationstudents and the effect on self-image and selfesteemSally AgobianiPlymouth Universitysally.agobiani@plymouth.ac.ukThis talk is based on research which focused onthe robustness of the label ‘dyslexia’ in a HigherEducation (HE) environment. A quantitativeapproach was used to investigate the prevalenceof co-existing dyslexia and Attention DeficitHyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptomologyamongst 190 students using a self-reportscreening tool based on DSM-5 criteria andlevels of self-image and self-esteem. It waspostulated that high rates of co-existence wouldsupport the notion that the term ‘dyslexia’ isinadequate, especially if the impact spreadsbeyond diagnostic criteria. The researchfound that 37.4% of the sample with dyslexiaself-reported significant ADHD symptoms.Furthermore, this group had significantlylower levels of self-esteem and self-image thanstudents with neither condition and studentswith dyslexia and no ADHD symptomology. Thissuggests that for HE students it is not dyslexiawhich adversely affects levels but either theadditive effect of dyslexia and symptoms of ADHD, or ADHD alone. The main conclusion isthat the diversity of symptoms and difficultiesrenders the term ‘dyslexia’ of limited use ininforming metacognition and interventions.Rather than abandon the term, however,‘dyslexia’ should be used as a starting pointrather than a clinical term with clearly definedsymptoms.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 10:48 - 11:06 GMT
Breakout Room 2

10:48 GMT

Motivation for Reading at School Entry for Children at Risk and not at Risk for Reading Difficulties
Limited Capacity filling up

Motivation For Reading At School Entry: Aninquiry of poor emergent readers and theirpeersBente R. Walgermo, Jan C. Frijters & Oddny J.SolheimLow emergent literacy skills at school entrypredict later reading difficulties. However,motivation for reading also affect children’sreading development. This is why scholarsacross fields have called for a broader literacyconception, moving beyond skills. In the presentstudy we have measured reading self-conceptand literacy interest in addition to emergentliteracy skills as children enter Grade 1. Thetarget question was to explore whether therewere differences in aspects of motivation forreading between children with high and lowemergent literacy skills.Both groups of participants reportedindiscriminately high interest in literacyactivities. However, at-risk children hadsignificantly lower reading self-concept thantheir peers. Analyses revealed that literacyinterest moderated the relationship betweenearly reading skill and self-concept for the poorearly readers. Results suggest that a negativereader self-concept may be an additional riskfactor for school starters with low early readingskills, and propose that resilient literacy interestmay function as a protective factor for readerself-concept at school entry

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 10:48 - 11:06 GMT
Breakout Room 3

10:52 GMT

Relationship between Behavioural Problems and Academic Achievement in Kuwait Primary Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

Relationship between Behavioural Problemsand Academic Achievement in Kuwait PrimarySchoolsYousuf AlmurtajiUniversity of Surreyxpxp555@hotmail.comCo-authors: John Everatt (University ofCanterbury), Alexandra Grandison (University ofSurrey), Naomi Winstone (University of Surrey),Abir Al-Sharhan (Center for Child Evaluation andTeaching), Gad Elbeheri (Australian College ofKuwait)Improving school students’ behaviourand academic achievement have becomecritical objectives for the Kuwaiti EducationAuthority. The current studies investigatedthe relationships between Kuwaiti primaryschool student’s behaviour and their academicachievement. Study 1 aimed to assess the levelof these relationships within typical schools.Study 2 investigated the potential influenceon literacy and numeracy achievement ofteacher training about dyslexia and behaviouralproblems. Study 3 surveyed the views ofteachers on issues related to teaching practiceand problem behaviour. Study 1 involved 163children been tested on measures of literacyand mathematics; teachers/parents alsocompleted checklists on negative behaviours.Study 2 involved four schools where training inmainstream school classroom management andeffective dyslexia practice had occurred. Thesewere compared to two control schools matchedon population and progression data.Pupils (513) were tested on study 1 achievementmeasures, and observations of classroombehaviours were undertaken. Study 3 useda questionnaire to determine the classroomstrategies of 42 teachers from trained/controlschools.Study 1 found relationships between behaviouralproblems and academic achievement in thisKuwaiti primary school context. Study 2 foundthat, in comparison to the control schools,trained schools showed fewer negativeclassrooms behaviours and better scores ineducational achievement, particularly in literacy.Trained schools also had fewer children in thebottom 25% of the distribution of scores inliteracy and mathematics. Study 3 found nodifference between trained and control teachersin self-reported teaching strategies, arguing forincreased practice effectiveness in the trainedschools.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 10:52 - 11:15 GMT
Breakout Room 4

11:06 GMT

Morphological Processing as a Top-down Compensatory Process in Dyslexic Adults. Evidence from MEG
Limited Capacity seats available

Morphological processing as a top-downcompensatory process in dyslexic adults.Evidence from MEGEddy CavalliLaboratory of Cognitive Psychology, Aix-MarseilleUniversity and CNRSeddy.cavalli@univ-amu.frCoauthors: Pascale Colé (Laboratory of CognitivePsychology, UMR 7290, Aix-Marseille Universityand CNRS), Chotiga Pattamadilok (Laboratory ofspeech and language, Aix-Marseille Universityand CNRS), and Johannes Ziegler (Laboratory ofCognitive Psychology, UMR 7290, Aix-MarseilleUniversity and CNRS)Developmental dyslexia is a neurologicaldisorder mainly characterized by severe andpersistent deficits in reading and phonologicaldecoding skills. According to the compensatoryhypothesis that dyslexics may be prone to relyon semantic units, morphological processing isproposed in this study as a plausible candidateto compensate for reading difficulties. This studyaims to investigate both the time course andlocalization of morphological, orthographic andsemantic processing using MEG associated witha primed-lexical decision task in French dyslexicuniversity students. We used 48 sets of fourprime-target word pairs with the same targetacross the four experimental conditions. Wordpairswere morphologically related floral – FLEUR[floral-flower], orthographically related fleuve –FLEUR [river-flower], semantically related tulipe– FLEUR [tulip-flower] or unrelated cantine –FLEUR [canteen-flower].Continuous MEG of cerebral activity wasrecorded using a 248-channel biomagnetometersystem. We focused our MEG analyses on theleft inferior fronto-occipital cortex includingthe FFG and posterior part of LITG, the LIFG(BA45/47) and the left orbitofrontal gyrus Results showed a dissociated pattern ofactivation both spatially and temporallybetween groups. While skilled readers exhibiteda bottom-up process with early orthographiceffect (M170) in posterior LITG and late morphosemanticeffect (M350) in LIFG BA47, dyslexicreaders exhibited a top-down process withearly morpho-semantic effect [100-200]ms inLIFG BA45 and late morpho-orthographic andsemantic effects (M350) in FFG. This findingsuggests a functional reorganization of the brainareas in dyslexic adults that might explain howthey managed to compensate for their readingdeficits.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 11:06 - 11:24 GMT
Breakout Room 2

11:06 GMT

Virtual Hebb Williams Maze: a Practicable Early Detection Method for Dyslexia?
Limited Capacity seats available

Virtual Hebb Williams Maze: a practicable earlydetection method for dyslexia?Evelyn JohnsonProfessor, Boise State Universityevelynjohnson@boisestate.eduCoauthor: Lisa Gabel, Lafayette College; JeffGruen, Yale University School of Medicine; JeffPffaffmann, Lafayette CollegeThe objective of this study was to determine ifchildren who exhibit impaired performance onthe Woodcock Reading Mastery III test (WRMT III) also exhibit altered visuo-spatial processing,and if these deficits are associated with alteredCDSG expression. We tested the workinghypothesis that children at risk for RD (i.e. thosewho exhibit a deficit on the WRMT-III) showvisuo-spatial deficits on the vHW maze task,and this correlates with the presence of knownrisk variants in CDSG. A total of 103 participantswere included, ranging in age from 5 - 13.Each participant completed the virtual HWmaze task (6 trials of 6 mazes), a WRMT testand provided a saliva sample for genetic testing.Results were analysed through a 2 x 5 x 6repeated measures ANOVA, and path analysiswas used to analyse the trials on the virtualmaze task. A subset of participants (n=35)provided data at both age 5-6 and again at age8-9 to examine the potential predictive validityof the vHW task on reading ability.We examined performance of children with andwithout RD on the vHW maze. Children with RDexhibited impaired performance. Path analysisresults show commonalities in problem solvingability in the impaired group, which may leadto a marker specific to individuals with RD. Datasuggest that typically developing children usestatistical learning strategies to navigate thevHW maze, but it is unclear what strategieschildren with RD employ. These data combinedwith genetic analysis of CDSG expression,provide powerful information toward our goal ofearly identification of children at risk for RD.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 11:06 - 11:24 GMT
Breakout Room 3

11:15 GMT

Addressing Dyslexia Toolkit and Free Interactive Professional Development Resources for Literacy
Limited Capacity full
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Addressing Dyslexia Toolkit and Free InteractiveProfessional Development Resources forLiteracyFran RanaldiDyslexia Scotlandtoolkit@dyslexiascotland.org.ukThe Addressing Dyslexia Toolkit is a ScottishGovernment-funded free national onlineresource highlighted throughout the 2014Education Scotland Dyslexia review ‘MakingSense: Education for Children and Young People with Dyslexia in Scotland’. Teaching andsupporting learners with literacy difficulties anddyslexia to become confident and successfullearners is achieved when teachers arethemselves confident and knowledgeable abouttheir teaching practice. This presentation willdemonstrate the Toolkit’s new, free, helpful andpractical interactive literacy resources which  have been developed through partnershipworking with the Toolkit Working Group,Dyslexia Scotland, Education Scotland andEducation Authorities within the context ofGIRFEC and Curriculum for Excellence.The interactive resources have been developedto provide a detailed view and understanding ofhow a child or young person’s literacy skills havedeveloped. They can be used in primary andsecondary sectors and may also be beneficialfor children and young people for whom Englishis not their first language and adults. The freeresources provide;• Descriptions of the key areas involved in theacquisition of reading and writing skills• Identifying areas of difficulty• Approaches/Strategies and links to resourcesfor each key area• A Practical resource sheet/ evaluation toolto record discussion, highlight strengths,difficulties and to plan the next stepsappropriately.This seminar will highlight classroom and wholeschool approaches which support practitionersto provide a consistent approach for literacydevelopment, leading to positive outcomes andraised achievement for learners.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 11:15 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 6

11:15 GMT

Singapore Maths and Dyscalculia - a Perfect Match?
Limited Capacity full
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Singapore Maths and Dyscalculia - a PerfectMatch?Judith Hornigold Educational Consultant, BDA judyh1@hotmail.comTo what extent the underlying pedagogy of theSingapore Maths approach can support learnerswith Dyscalculia and Maths Learning Difficultiesgenerally. The work of Piaget, Vygostsky, Bruner,Skemp and Diennes will be set in the context ofa problem solving approach to teaching mathsand links will be made to current researchers inthe field such as Boaler and Dweck. The sessionworkshop will be hands on and designed topromote discussion and debate. There will bethe opportunity to work in small groups. TheSingapore maths approach works for all learners,not just the more able. Its original purpose wasto support struggling learners and is thereforeideal for children with dyscalculia and MLD.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 11:15 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 5

11:15 GMT

Turning Procrastination into Action: Mindfulness for Study for Students with SpLDs
Limited Capacity full
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Turning Procrastination into Action:Mindfulness for Study for Students with SpLDsKarisa KrcmarSenior Tutor/Manager Study Support Service,Loughborough Universityk.krcmar@lboro.ac.uk Co-author: Tina HorsmanInspired by the centuries-old practice ofmeditation, Mindfulness for Study is a uniqueprogramme bringing this approach to the 21stcentury and to HE students with SpLDs. Thisworkshop explains how we used mindfulnessalongside multi-sensory study skills to enablestudents to move away from procrastinationto focused action. Participants will be invitedto experience some mindfulness exercises.Specialist teachers and practitioners audience isinvited to take part in mindfulness exercises anddiscuss how they can use it in their own practice.Mindfulness for Study is an accessible tool whichleads students towards metacognition, selfadvocacyand self-empowerment. Mindfulness,in tandem with specialist study support,helps students develop skills to move fromprocrastination to action.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 11:15 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 4

11:24 GMT

Research on Extraordinarily Successful Adults with Dyslexia and Learning Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Research on Extraordinarily Successful Adultswith Dyslexia and Learning DisabilitiesPaul GerberProfessor of Special Education and DisabilityPolicy, Virginia Commonwealth University Schoolof Educationpjgerber@vcu.eduThe purpose of this study was to presenta thematic view of the thoughts, feelings,and personal philosophies of extraordinarilysuccessful individuals who have “made it despitethe odds”. The rationale is straight forward.By considering the trials and tribulations ofthese individuals there are implications forprofessional practice, transition preparationand overall adjustment for the beyondschool years. A select group of 12 individualswith dyslexia and learning disabilities werestudied via an interview protocol whose itemswere constructed based on prior research.The participants were scientists, engineers,entrepreneurs, writers to name some.The interviews were analyzed using qualitativeanalysis and yielded a number of importantthemes. Among the many themes were findingone’s niche, overcoming challenges, dyslexiaas a gift, and problem solving as a way of life.One overriding theme was “not too tidy a tale”where dyslexia was found not to be a “one sizefits all” phenomenon, but a series of complexchallenges, necessitating a variety of approachesto foster success.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 11:24 - 11:42 GMT
Breakout Room 2

11:24 GMT

Screening Dyslexia in Adults
Limited Capacity seats available

Assessing Dyslexia in Upper Secondary Studentsin NorwayTrude Nergård-NilssenUiT – The Arctic University of Norwaytrude.nergard.nilssen@uit.noApproximately 30% Norwegian students donot complete upper secondary education. Theprevalence of dropouts in Norway has beenremarkably stable for the last two decades(Statisics Norway, 2014; OECD, 2013). Similarly,results from the Adult Literacy and Life SkillsSurvey (ALL) show that more than 30% of theNorwegian adult population (16-65 years) areat entry level 2 or below. It appears to be amismatch between these figures and the share of students eligible for special needs educationin upper secondary. A corollary of this is thatmany students enter upper secondary educationwith undetected literacy disorders. One possiblereason for this may be the lack of standardisedscreening tools in Norway. ‘The NorwegianScreening Test for Literacy Disorders’ wasrecently developed to identify students withpossible literacy disorders. It was designed to becarried out group-wise, easy to administer, andto assess a range of literacy skills at.Validation was established by comparing aNon-impaired group (n = 178) and Impairedgroup (n = 54). Results showed significantgroup differences across all areas in thescreening battery. Logistic regression analysesdemonstrated good discriminatory power(with 90.7% sensitivity and 73.0% specificity,respectively). The screening test might be auseful and valid tool for identifying students atrisk, and who thus need to be referred to a fulldiagnostic investigation by a specialist.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 11:24 - 11:42 GMT
Breakout Room 3

11:42 GMT

Assessing Prose Reading Skills amongst a Large Group of FE and HE students in the UK
Limited Capacity seats available

Assessing Prose Reading Skills Amongst a LargeGroup of FE and HE Students in the UK.Rob FidlerDisability Advisor and DSA Assessor, Universityof Surreyr.fidler@surrey.ac.ukCoauthors: Peter Brooks (IndependentEducational Psychologist) and John Everatt(University of Canterbury, New Zealand)The first edition of the Adult Reading Testhas been in use for 10 years. It providedpractitioners with measures of prose readingto support assessments of special educationalneeds, particularly related to dyslexia, withintertiary education populations in the UK. TheART involved students reading prose passagesaloud and measured reading accuracy, speedand comprehension. The present paper reportswork to revise some of the passages, updatethe norms for the test and provide additionalmeasures of silent passage reading to furtherinform assessment practices. Eight readingpassages were developed and tested on studentsin 4 FEIs and 3 HEIs across England.Passages were split into two groups of 4,increasing in difficulty; one set of 4 passageswere read aloud the other set of 4 silently.Measures of prose reading accuracy,comprehension and speed were obtained.Participants were recruited and paid and anopportunity sample obtained, with referenceto gender, level of course and age. Testing wasconducted on a 1:1 basis with researchersin each institution. Comparisons were madewith a word reading test and a sentencecomprehension test. Standardization proceduresfor the first edition indicated that ART candistinguish those with and without a historyof reading difficulties; and showed reasonablepsychometric properties. Data collection forART2 is ongoing with an estimated sampleof 500-600 expected. Analysis of data will bebased on (i) comparisons between those withself-reported reading difficulties and thosewithout, and (ii) comparisons between readingsilently and aloud. Analysis of the relationshipbetween reading accuracy, comprehension and speed amongst these adult learners will also beundertaken.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 11:42 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 2

11:42 GMT

Neural Unity but Behavioural Dissociation in Developmental Dyslexia
Limited Capacity seats available

Neural Unity but Behavioural Dissociation inDevelopmental DyslexiaTaeko WydellCentre for Cognition and Neuroimaging, BrunelUniversitytaeko.wydell@brunel.ac.ukCoauthors: Tadahisa Kondo, KougakuinUniversity, Tokyo, JapanBehavioural studies showed that AS, anEnglish-Japanese bilingual was a skilledreader in Japanese but was a phonologicaldyslexic in English, thus showing behavioraldissociation between the two languages.Magnetoencephalography (MEG) was employedin order to ascertain (i) neural correlatesof reading in English and Japanese SyllabicKana, and (ii) how MEG recording of AS mightdiffer from those of English/Japanese controlsin making phonological lexical decisionswith pseudohomophones thus forcing theparticipants to use a sub-lexical grapheme/character-to-phoneme/sound-conversionstrategy.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 11:42 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 3

12:00 GMT

Lunch and posters
Thursday March 10, 2016 12:00 - 13:00 GMT
Venue

13:00 GMT

A Dimensional Approach to Developmental Impairments of Attention, Learning and Memory
Professor Susan GathercoleMRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, and University of CambridgeTitle: A dimensional approach to developmental impairments of attention, learning and memoryAbstract: There are few invariant cognitive characteristics within the diagnostic categories ofADHD, dyslexia, Specific Language Impairment or dyscalculia, but the overlap of symptomsand co-morbidity across the different diagnoses are high. Findings are reported from a studydesigned to identify the common and potentially co-occurring cognitive dimensions thatunderpin this pattern of low sensitivity and specificity of conventional diagnoses. A new researchclinic has been established in Cambridge for children that span attention, learning (to includelanguage and academic attainment) and/ or memory, referred by practitioners in education andhealth. At the clinic, children complete a wide range of cognitive assessments, and parent ratetheir behaviour. The children are also invited back for MRI scanning.Despite high variability in routes by which the children are referred and the reasons cited fortheir referral, a simple dimensional structure characterises the profiles of the first 130 childrenattending the clinic. General learning abilities are highly associated with a verbal dimension,and a highly specific association has been established between nonverbal abilities, ratedbehavioural problems, and maths achievement. This approach illustrates the value of adopting abroad-based dimensional approach not only for understanding the fundamental constraints onchildren’s learning, but on the guiding the selection of appropriate interventions that are basedon symptom profile rather than diagnosis.

Chair
Keynote
PS

Professor Susan Gathercole

Biography: Susan Gathercole is the Unit Director at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit.She is a research psychologist, best known for her studies into working memory deficits inchildren. She has worked extensively with Professor Alan Baddeley, the co-creator, along withProfessor... Read More →


Thursday March 10, 2016 13:00 - 13:45 GMT
Auditorium

13:50 GMT

Dyslexia and Success: Out of Despair comes the phoenix of success
Limited Capacity seats available

Dyslexia and Success: Out of despair comes thephoenix of success Neil Alexander-PasseHead of Learning Support, Mill Hill School,Londonneilpasse@aol.co.uk Based on the author’s new book (2017 byJessica Kingsley Publishers). This researchinvestigates the nature of everyday successamongst dyslexics, looking at their motivationsand stories of battling against the odds. Thisstudy understands why many dyslexics onlysucceed post-school, and why others do not.This research will be used in schools to developsuccessful outcomes for young dyslexics. N=20 successful dyslexic adults, male/female.Investigative IPA methodology, IPA datathen moved into quantitative charts to aidunderstanding. N=100 survey monkey also usedto gain an understanding of the field of dyslexiaand success N=20 dyslexic adults as a focusgroup investigated the subjectMany identified with failing at school, andhaving non-academic success. Their failure atschool motivated them to do well in business.Many had ‘chips on their shoulders’ aboutnot succeeding as per their peers. Many overachievedin life, and in multiple fields. Thetheory of ‘Post-traumatic growth disorder’ isused to understand successful dyslexics andquestions if failure in mainstream schools isintegral to post-school success.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 13:50 - 14:08 GMT
Breakout Room 2

13:50 GMT

Spatial Attention Shifting and Phonological Processing in Adults with Dyslexia
Limited Capacity filling up

Spatial Attention Shifting and PhonologicalProcessing in Adults with DyslexiaIan AbbottWiltshire Councilian.abbott@wiltshire.gov.ukCo-authors: Andrew Dunn, Nottingham TrentUniversity; Rebecca Larkin, Nottingham TrentUniversityAccording to Hari and Renvall’s sluggishattentional shifting hypothesis people withdyslexia have a central deficit in attention  shifting. We assessed whether a group of adultswith dyslexia showed impaired performanceon shifting visual spatial attention. In order todirectly build on previous research the currentstudy assessed whether spatial attention was aunique predictor of non-word reading accuracy.Results add to a growing body of literature thatemphasizes the potential role of processingspeed alongside phonological skills in persistentreading difficulties.Twelve adults with dyslexia and 12 controladult participants took part in a focusedattention orientation task and a shift attentionorientation task. The participants also completedstandardized measures of single word reading,spelling, IQ, phonological processing, speed ofprocessing and non-word reading. Overall, thedyslexic participants showed the same pattern ofperformance as the control participants on theattention orienting task, albeit at a consistentlyslower pace. Findings seem to emphasize thepotential role of speed of processing in nonwordreading, as opposed to the ability to shiftspatial attention. Accordingly, we conclude thata deficit in cognitive processing speed (e.g.sluggish attention) may characterize dyslexiabut it occurs alongside core difficulties withphonological awareness.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 13:50 - 14:08 GMT
Breakout Room 3

13:50 GMT

Empowering and Educating Parents to Assist Children with Dyslexia in Successful School Transition
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Empowering and Educating Parents to AssistChildren with Dyslexia in Successful SchoolTransitionMarie McCarronQueen’s Universitymarie.mccarron@queensu.caCo-authors: Allyson Harrison, Marie McCarron,HarrisonBased on measured outcomes (survey data), theworkshop will focus on the essential skills andknowledge parents require to help their childwith dyslexia to make a successful transitionto different levels of education. The workshopwill highlight the key areas: self-understanding,knowing your rights, support services available(including adaptive technology), and selfadvocacy.The workshop is aimed at headteachers, policy makers and parents of childrenwith dyslexia. The workshop will be interactivewith small group exercises aimed at showcasing our parent intervention program and thematerial developed.Parental involvement is crucial to the academicand social success of children with Dyslexia. Toprepare children to transition to higher levelsof education, parents need programs targetedat developing educational plans, enhancingtheir child’s self-understanding, self-esteem andadvocacy skills, improving knowledge regardingschool procedures, and understanding availableadaptive technology.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 13:50 - 14:35 GMT
Breakout Room 6

13:50 GMT

Multi-paragraph Writing and Comprehension of Textbook Reading for Upper Elementary Student
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Multi-paragraph Writing and Comprehensionof Textbook Reading for Upper ElementaryStudentsSusan HeinzUniversity of Alaska Anchorage/SlingerlandInstitute for Literacysueheinz@aol.comThis session will explore ways to assist studentstoward independence in writing multi-paragraphassignments and reading textbooks for learningnew information after achieving basic skills froma Multisensory Structured Language Approach.Ideas are relevant for classroom teachers andtutoring situations; elementary and middleschool students. Many students learn basicEnglish language skills for reading and writingsuccessfully when taught explicitly with a MultisensoryLanguage Approach. However, thesestudents often need additional, direct instructionto develop skills and strategies for independentacademic writing and learning from textbooks inthe upper grades.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 13:50 - 14:35 GMT
Breakout Room 5

13:50 GMT

Supporting Spelling: Making the links and meeting the challenges
Limited Capacity full
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Supporting Spelling: Making the links andmeeting the challengesGill Brackenbury and Jennifer DonovanUniversity College London Institute of Educationg.brackenbury@ioe.ac.uk and j.donovan@ioe.ac.ukThis workshop will explore evidence-basedpractice and how this can be used effectivelyto inform support for children who areexperiencing spelling difficulties. Participantswill be provided with some alternative tools toconsider when assessing and support spelling.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 13:50 - 14:35 GMT
Breakout Room 4

13:50 GMT

Supporting Spelling: Making the links and meeting the challenges
Limited Capacity filling up

Supporting Spelling: Making the links andmeeting the challengesGill Brackenbury and Jennifer DonovanUniversity College London Institute of Educationg.brackenbury@ioe.ac.uk and j.donovan@ioe.ac.ukThis workshop will explore evidence-basedpractice and how this can be used effectivelyto inform support for children who areexperiencing spelling difficulties. Participantswill be provided with some alternative tools toconsider when assessing and support spelling.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 13:50 - 14:35 GMT
Breakout Room 4

13:50 GMT

Complementary Perspectives on the Development of Vocabulary in Monolingual and L2 Children
Complementary Perspectives on theDevelopment of Vocabulary in Monolingual andL2 ChildrenEsther GevaUniversity of Torontoesther.geva@utoronto.caVocabulary skills are critical for readingcomprehension and academic acheivement. Bydefinition, second language (L2) learners canbe expected to lag behind their monolingual(L1) counterparts. This lag can be understoodby considering an array of developmental,contextual, intra-individual, and instructionalfactors. This symposium examines the  development of L2 vocabulary and L1 vocabularyfrom a number of complementary perspectives.The first two presentations examine intraindividualand contextual factors that contributeto vocabulary development. Monsrud and Gevafocus on questions such vocabulary breadthin L2 learners and contextual and cognitivefactors that contribute or impede vocabularylearning in minority children in Norway. Farniaand Geva examine differential patterns ofdevelopmental of vocabulary over time in L1 andL2 learners and the predictors of these distinctpatterns. The third presentation by Brandes andMcMaster focuses on instructional practices. Itreports on a study that examined the utility of arepeated reading intervention with and withoutvocabulary instruction on the reading fluency,comprehension, and vocabulary learning of atriskEnglish Language Learners (ELLs). Victor VanDaal, the discussant, will provide a synthesis anddiscuss future directions.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 13:50 - 15:20 GMT
Auditorium

13:50 GMT

The Role of Phonology in Deaf and Hearing Impaired Children’s Literacy
Limited Capacity seats available

The role of phonology in deaf and hearingimpaired children’s literacy.Julia CarrollCoventry Universityjulia.carroll@coventry.ac.ukIt is well established that phonological skills areimportant in successful reading, but access tophonology is restricted in children with hearingimpairments. This symposium investigates therole of phonology and compensatory skills suchas speech reading and morphological knowledgein literacy development for these children. Wepresent up-to-date information on the outcomesof deaf UK school leavers as well as examiningthe role of phonology in deaf children learningspoken versus signed language, and comparisonsbetween children with a history of otitis mediaand children with dyslexia. 

Keynote
PJ

Professor Julia Carroll,

Julia Carroll joined Coventry University in September 2014 as a Reader in ChildDevelopment and Education. Prior to that she had been an Associate Professor at the Universityof Warwick, having joined there in 2004. She completed her DPhil in York in 2001 and stayed onto do a postdoctoral... Read More →


Thursday March 10, 2016 13:50 - 15:20 GMT
Breakout Room 1

14:08 GMT

A Review of Visual Conditions that may Co-occur with Dyslexia
Limited Capacity full
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A review of visual conditions that may co-occurwith dyslexiaBruce EvansInstitute of Optometry, City University London,London South Bank Universityadmin@ioo.org.ukDyslexia was originally attributed to wordblindness but it is now widely recognised thatvisual factors are not major causes of dyslexia.However, several visual anomalies have beenclaimed to co-occur with dyslexia. This remainsa topic of controversy between and even withinthe eye care professions. This presentation willreview the evidence on this topic, without theprejudice of assuming causality for correlates.PubMed and other databases were searchedfor case-control and cross-sectional studies thataimed to detect visual correlates of dyslexia.Relevant visual conditions and tests wereclassified. For the several correlates that were identified, the evidence was considered todetermine whether they are likely to be noncausalcorrelates, contributory factors, or causesof dyslexia.Most dyslexic children have normal vision butsome visual conditions are more prevalentin dyslexia than in good readers. Althoughcontroversial, the most common of these maybe Visual Stress, occurring to a significant degreein about one in five children with dyslexia. Thiscan cause eyestrain, headaches, and visualperceptual distortions and is alleviated withcoloured filters. Less common visual correlatesof dyslexia include binocular instability andaccommodative insufficiency. These conditionsare unlikely to be major causative factors, butmay contribute to some children’s reluctance toread.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 14:08 - 14:26 GMT
Breakout Room 3

14:08 GMT

The Effectiveness of Literacy McCarron Interventions on the Psychosocial Development of Students with Literacy Learning Difficulties
Limited Capacity seats available

The Effectiveness of Literacy Interventions onthe Psychosocial Development of Students withLiteracy Learning DifficultiesAmanda DenstonUniversity of Canterburyamanda.denston@pg.canterbury.ac.nzCo-authors: John Everatt, Faye Parkhill, ChuckMarriottThe research aimed to determine if thepsychosocial development of students withliteracy learning difficulties (LLD) could bepositively affected by targeting their literacydevelopment, via an academic interventionthat included explicit and challenging literacyinstruction. For students with LLD (whichincludes dyslexia in NZ), difficulties may affectpsychosocial development, such as self-esteem.Lower academic self-esteem is closely associatedwith academic achievement and can influencemotivation, engagement, emotional well-being  and the development of peer relationships.Three studies were employed to determine theeffectiveness of the intervention. The researchcomprised pre-/post-intervention designs.Participants (n = 21, 20, 16) were from Grades3 to 5. Students participated in 30-minutesessions that involved a decoding, vocabulary,and fluency format or instruction in morphologyand orthography. Assessment included readingaccuracy/comprehension, and morphology;global/academic self-esteem, and self-efficacy.Changes in literacy skills and psychosocialdevelopment were calculated. Associationsbetween the measures and levels of changeinvestigated.Results indicated that a targeted interventioncan promote psychosocial development; aswell as, the development of literacy skills.However, changes in literacy skills may affectpsychosocial development differently. Academicself-esteem showed varied change in all thestudies. Increases in self-efficacy suggested thatstudents’ perceptions of their literacy abilityhad altered; peer relations were an influentialfactor. The inclusion of literacy skills aimed atdeveloping meta-linguistic awareness was moreeffective than a general focus on literacy skills.These areas will be discussed.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 14:08 - 14:26 GMT
Breakout Room 2

14:26 GMT

A Picture Paints a Thousand Words: Transforming Comprehension, Engagement and Recall in HE Lectures
Limited Capacity seats available

Life after Death by PowerPoint: more pictures,less text, happier learning? David RobertsLoughborough Universityd.roberts@lboro.ac.ukDyslexic students at University report highlevels of stress from exposure to text-heavyPowerPoint lectures, which seem the normacross HE. But Multimedia Learning (MML)research, which stresses the value of usingimages for all sighted students in HE, argues thatusing images will enhance dyslexic students’engagement and attention. We tested thisclaim with volunteer dyslexic students andfound overwhelming support for privilegingsophisticated literal and figurative imagesdelivered by easily ‘flipping’ how we usePowerPoint. We present using the image-basedmethod itself, include the test results, anddemonstrate how to use apposite imagery.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 14:26 - 14:44 GMT
Breakout Room 2

14:26 GMT

Visual Crowding in Normal and Dyslexic Children: Who Benefits from Extra Letter Spacing and Why?
Limited Capacity filling up

Visual crowding in normal and dyslexicchildren: Who benefits from extra letter spacingand why?Jurgen Tijms, Britt Hakvoort, Madelon van denBoer, Tineke Leenaars, & Petra BosRudolf Berlin Center, University of Amsterdamj.tijms@uva.nlReading is inherently a cross-modal process inwhich visual information on letter-strings needsto be integrated with the corresponding auditoryspeech-sound information. The role of visualprocesses in reading has received surprisinglylittle attention, compared to the role of auditoryphonologicalprocesses. Visual crowding is aphenomenon by which the recognition of anobject can be hindered by flankering objects. Interms of reading, the recognition of letters canbe hindered by surrounding letters, dependingon the interletter spacing.In this study we aimed to provide a windowon the impact of visual crowding on reading indyslexic and typical readers. We presented textsin normal letter spacing and extra-large interletterspacing in several conditions to dyslexicand non-dyslexic children. Our results revealedthat for all children extra letter-spacing hadno effect on reading speed, while it did have apositive effect on text reading accuracy whensentences were presented fully at once, but not when sentences were presented word by word.Dyslexic and normal readers benefitted equallyfrom extra-large letter spacing.The results suggest that visual crowding impactsreading accuracy on the inter-word level, andnot so much at an inter-letter level, and thatsensitivity to visual crowding is not a typicalaetiological factor in dyslexia.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 14:26 - 14:44 GMT
Breakout Room 3

14:35 GMT

Dyscalculia in Higher Education
Limited Capacity full
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Dyscalculia in Higher EducationClare Trott, Simon Drew and Hilary MaddocksLoughborough UniversityC.Trott@lboro.ac.ukThe Mathematics Education Centre (MEC) atLoughborough University is recognized forproviding excellence in the delivery of universitywidemathematics support. The centre wasestablished in 2002 to provide one-to-onesupport for students at all levels of study andensure students have equal opportunity to reachtheir potential. Within the MEC, the EurekaCentre for Mathematical Confidence specificallysupports students with a range of neurodiverseneeds.This workshop, presented by The Eureka Centrefor Mathematical Confidence, will focus onworking with dyscalculia and mathematicslearning difficulties in Higher Education. Theworkshop will begin with a brief overview ofdyscalculia, highlighting key research. This willprovide the foundations on which the workshopwill build. We will then reflect on the currentprocess for screening for dyscalculia.The main part of the workshop will considersupport for dyscalculia in H.E.. We will present3 case studies, highlighting the mathematicaldifficulties experienced by each of the casestudies.None of the students in the case studies are studying mathematics but mathematical orstatistical concepts are an intrinsic part of theircourses. Throughout the workshop participantswill have the opportunity to engage withactivities and feedback their discussions. Theworkshop will be aimed at delegates who areworking in Higher Education and those who areinterested in dyscalculia and maths learningdifficulties.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 14:35 - 15:20 GMT
Breakout Room 6

14:35 GMT

Getting it right with assistive technology: lessons from research and practice in Sweden and the UK
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Getting It Right with Assistive Technology: Lessons from Research and Practice in Sweden and the UKJohn RackDirector of Education and PolicyDyslexia Action and Linnaeus Universityjrack@dyslexiaaction.org.ukCo-authors: Johanna Kristensson, Halmstads KommunThe main purpose of this study is to give examples of effective practice and to identify key principles that lie behind successful use of assistive technology for those with literacy and related specific difficulties. This is important because practitioners need to choose good tools and, currently, data and guidance to help do this is scarce.We use a case-study approach, with observations in practice supported by interview and questionnaire data. The three case studies involve: developing reading skills through writing using tablets in First and Second Grade; spelling support for those in middle-school years and; providing reading support in a personalized and an instructional way.The studies support the view that assistive technology should be introduced early and inclusively. It should be seen as a standard tool, thus avoiding a ‘special needs’ image which can be disengaging both for learners and teachers. We argue that the best-designed and best-implemented technology has both an assistive and a skills-development element, and can be used flexibly and easily integrated into wider learning plans and activities. These and other points are illustrated with reference to the case studies and other examples of well-designed software applications.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 14:35 - 15:20 GMT
Breakout Room 5

14:35 GMT

Moving Forward: Supporting Students with Neurodiversity and Co-occurring Mental Health Difficulties
Limited Capacity full
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Moving Forward: Supporting Students withNeurodiversity and Co-occurring Mental HealthDifficultiesTina HorsmanLoughborough Universityt.g.horsman@lboro.ac.ukA co-occurrence of neurodiversity and mentalhealth difficulties is being seen within DSAsupported students. This workshop focuseson the implications for the student and tutorin the 1:1 study support setting. Throughcase studies and interactive activities itexplores the key elements of difficultyand techniques for supporting the study,emotional and metacognitive needs of thesestudents. Participants will better understandthe key elements of DSA recognised mentalhealth conditions and their interaction withneurodiversity. They will take away ideas for appropriate strategies to add to their teachingtoolbox.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 14:35 - 15:20 GMT
Breakout Room 4

14:44 GMT

Legal Lexical Decision Making in Adult Dyslexia
Limited Capacity seats available

Legal Lexical Decision-Making in Adult Dyslexia:Indications for Neurophysiologically DifferentProcessing of Italic FontLéon Franzen & Marios PhiliastidesInstitute of Neuroscience and Psychology,University of Glasgowl.franzen.1@research.gla.ac.ukTo date EEG research has revealed that lexicalaccess and word-frequency effects start as earlyas 110ms after stimulus onset in populationswithout specific reading disabilities. Separatebehavioural research has addressed the effect offont style on readability for dyslexics; however,the neural processing of font style itself remainsunknown for the dyslexic population. Ourstudy investigates the temporal neural basis ofdyslexics’ legal lexical decision-making by lookingat the effects of font style and word-frequencyon decision accuracy and event relatedpotentials (ERP) in EEG data.Behavioural results show significant maineffects for word-frequency and font style anda significant group effect for italicised wordsof low frequency. Additionally, ERP resultsrevealed amplitude differences and differentscalp distributions between the dyslexic and thecontrol group. These amplitude effects start asearly as 100ms post stimulus. They are presentacross the entire brain, whereas a latencydifference was only found in the left hemisphere.These novel findings suggest examining theneural effects of changes in font style in anapplied context in more detail.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 14:44 - 15:03 GMT
Breakout Room 2

14:44 GMT

Rhythmic Timing at School Entry as a Predictor of Poor Word Reading and Spelling at End of Grade 1
Limited Capacity filling up

Rhythmic timing at school entry as a predictorof poor word reading and spelling at end ofgrade 1Kjersti LundetræNorwegian Reading Centre, University ofStavangerkjersti.lundetre@uis.noCo-authors: Jenny Thomson, University ofSheffield; Per Henning Uppstad, University ofStavanger; Oddny Judith Solheim, University ofStavangerRhythm plays an organisational role in theprosody and phonology of language, andchildren with dyslexia have been found todemonstrate poor rhythmic perception. Thisstudy seeks to explore whether students’performance on a simple rhythm task at schoolentry can serve as a predictor of whether theywill face difficulties in word reading and spellingat end of grade 1. Although the link betweenrhythmic perception and dyslexia is wellestablished in literature, less is known aboutrhythmic timing before onset of formal readinginstruction and prediction of reading andspelling one year later. The participants were 516Norwegian 6-years-old first graders randomizedas controls in the longitudinal RCT On Track (n =1171).Rhythmic timing and pre-reading skills weretested individually at school entry (T1) on adigital tablet. On the rhythm task, the studentswere told to tap a drum appearing on the screento two different rhythms (2 Hz paced and 1.5Hz paced). Children’s responses were recordedas they tapped on the screen with their indexfinger. At the end of grade 1 (T2), children withdifferent levels of rhythmic timing from T1were compared on word reading and spelling.Students’ performance on a simple rhythm taskat school start can predict poor word readingand spelling skills at the end of grade 1. Thelowest performing 10% of the students on thetask of rhythmic timing performed significantlyworse on word reading and spelling at the endof grade 1, compared to the average-performinggroup (Cohens’d >.6). The results indicate thata simple measure, as used in this study, candetect children at risk for reading difficulties atthe onset of reading instruction at age 6.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 14:44 - 15:03 GMT
Breakout Room 3

15:03 GMT

Dyslexia in Adulthood: Experiences, Coping and the Importance of Resilience
Limited Capacity seats available

Dyslexia in the Adulthood: Barriers andEnablers to SuccessMelody TerrasUniversity of the West of ScotlandMelody.Terras@uws.ac.ukThis presentation aims to set the contextfor the symposium Dyslexia in adulthood:Challenges, Barriers and Enablers by providingan overview of research and practice relatingto Dyslexia in adulthood. A synthesis of theexisting evidence documenting the challengesencountered across a range of contexts (e.g.education. social) will be discussed to helpidentify barriers and enablers to success.The socio-emotional dimension will also beexamined and the importance of adaptivecoping strategies and resilience discussed.A cross-disciplinary literature review allowedidentification of research relating to Dyslexia inadulthood. Only peer-reviewed, quantitative andqualitative papers were included and the maincriteria for inclusion were that the study focusedon Dyslexia in adults. A systematic search wasconducted on a number of databases: EMBASE,PsychLIT, PsychINFO, MEDLINE, ERIC and theSocial Sciences Citation Index (SSCI). Dyslexiaimpacts negatively upon self-esteem, socioemotionalwell-being, relationships, educationand career choice. Positive experiencesconcerning the identification of their dyslexia,successful intervention and support werefound. The relative benefits of quantitative andqualitative methods were examined and theimmense insights offered by qualitative datarecognised. Future research would benefit fromadopting both a longitudinal and mixed methodsapproach to further inform understanding of thebarrier and enablers to success experienced byadults with dyslexia.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 15:03 - 15:20 GMT
Breakout Room 2

15:03 GMT

Phonological Skills, Visual Attention Span, and Visual Stress in Developmental Dyslexia
Limited Capacity full
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Phonological skills, visual attention span, andvisual stress in developmental dyslexiaAmanda SaksidaPSL Research University, Paris, Franceamanda.saksida@gmail.comCo-authors: Genedys Consortium, FranckRamusThe present study aims to concurrentlyinvestigate three distinct types of cognitivedeficits that are potential causes ofdevelopmental dyslexia: the phonologicaldeficit, the visual attention span deficit, andvisual stress. For this purpose, we administeredthe tests relevant to each hypothesis to alarge French population of 164 dyslexic and118 control children. We aim to estimate therelative prevalence of each type of deficit withinthe French dyslexic population, their potentialoverlap, and their explanatory value with respectto diagnostic category and to literacy skills.As part of a larger study on the genetic basesof dyslexia we tested 282 (164 dyslexic, 118control) French children (8-13 years old, grades 3to 7). All children were tested with psychometrictests (Wisc IV), underwent attention screening(Child Behaviour Checklist), and completedreading tasks (Alouette and Odedys).They also completed phonological assessment(they were tested on RAN, spoonerisms, andphoneme deletion), visual attention span test(global and partial letter report) and a patternglare test to assess visual stress. We havefound that dyslexic children are in general veryimpaired in phonological skills. Less than athird (28%) are also impaired in visual attentionspan, but none of the dyslexic children showedonly visual and no phonological deficit. Onlyfew children reported visual stress, and theproportion did not differ between the two groups of participants. Overall, visual deficits didnot significantly explain the variance in readingsills, nor did they serve as a good predictor ofdyslexia. The results thus support the theory ofdyslexia as a primary phonological deficit.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 15:03 - 15:20 GMT
Breakout Room 3

15:20 GMT

Coffee Break and posters
Thursday March 10, 2016 15:20 - 15:50 GMT
Venue

15:50 GMT

Phonological Awareness and Reading Difficulties
Title: Phonological awareness and reading difficulties.Abstract: In the last 30 years there has been arguably more research done on phonologicalawareness and reading difficulties than on any other cognitive skill associated with why childrenlearn to read and why they fail. There is a huge amount of research on this topic. A recent WhatWorks Clearinghouse (WWC, 2012) report on phonological awareness training identified 225 studies in their search of the literature. So much has been done yet there is so little agreement.There are two reasons for this. The first reason is that much of the research has not met highevidence standards. Troia (1999) reviewed dozens of training studies and found imperfectionsin many of them. The second reason is that researchers do not agree a) whether phonologicalawareness is a prerequisite for learning to read or a result of learning to read or b) whetherteaching phonemic awareness will have an impact over and beyond that of learning letter-soundcorrespondences. On the positive side there is general agreement that phonological awareness(and especially phonemic awareness) is important for learning to read. The thing is to ensurethat children do acquire this awareness, whether by teaching it with oral language activities, orby learning letter-sound correspondences as in phonics instruction, or even by reading books asin shared book reading because without it they will fail to learn to read.

Chair
Keynote
PT

Professor Tom Nicholson

Biography: Tom Nicholson gained his PhD at the University of Minnesota and worked atThe University of Waikato and The University of Auckland where he held a personal chair inEducation and was co-head of the School of Education before coming to Massey University’sAuckland campus... Read More →


Thursday March 10, 2016 15:50 - 16:35 GMT
Auditorium

16:35 GMT

Amazing Apps: Accessibility for the Road Ahead
Limited Capacity seats available

Apps: Accessibility for the road aheadRobert McLaren and Adam HylandDiversity and Ability (DnA)robert.mclaren@dnamatters.co.uk, adam@dnamatters.co.ukThe workshop will facilitate a discussion andprovide an overview of how free/low-cost appscan complement existing Assistive Technology(AT) provision. It will also focus on the role ofsuch technology in ensuring that, even with changes to the DSA, all neurodiverse learnersare able to benefit from key study techniquesand strategies. Participants will explore howchanges within DSA and the growing popularityof agile apps create a greater role for free/low cost AT for SpLD students. They will gain acomprehensive understanding of the range ofapps available, and the study strategies theycomplement. Participants will also have theopportunity to reflect upon the application ofthese ideas to their practice.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 16:35 - 17:20 GMT
Breakout Room 2

16:35 GMT

EAL Learners with SpLDs – a Continuing Challenge
Limited Capacity seats available

EAL learners with SpLDs – a continuingchallengeAnne Margaret SmithELT wellams@ELTwell.co.ukThe typical language learning process can oftenbe mistaken for SpLDs in EAL learners. Thisworkshop explores ways of distinguishing themso that appropriate interventions can be put inplace. Participants will examine samples of workin the light of screening materials designed formultilingual learners and discuss what supportneeds are suggested. Assessors and specialistteachers must distinguish between languagerelateddifficulties and underlying cognitivedifferences when dyslexia or another SpLD issuspected of causing delays in learning for EALlearners. To meet this challenge, alternativeassessment tools are needed that allow barriersto learning to be identified and addressed.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 16:35 - 17:20 GMT
Breakout Room 3

16:35 GMT

Mind Reading for Teachers: Memory, Metacognition and Effective Learning
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Mind Reading for Teachers: Memory,Metacognition and Effective LearningJennie Guise and Gavin ReidDysguise Ltd - specialists in assessment fordyslexia and other related specific learningdifficultiesjennieguise@dysguise.com and gavinreid66@gmail.comThe workshop will focus on working memory,long-term memory andmetacognitive learning. Together, theseelements can have a significant impact onlearning outcomes for children and youngpeople with dyslexia. We will also focus on howchildren with dyslexia can take more control overtheir own learning, and utilize this is to extendtheir memory skills and to minimise the impactof working memory difficulties.The workshop will provide answers to questionssuch as:• Why is working memory so important?• How can we test working memory?• What does low working memory look like?• How can we support children with workingmemory problems in class?• How can we develop and improve memoryskills in general?• How can we promote independent learningand metacognitive awareness in youngpeople with dyslexia?

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 16:35 - 17:20 GMT
Breakout Room 4

16:35 GMT

Moving Forward in Practice: from Problem Solving to Strength-Based Assessment
Limited Capacity filling up

Moving forward in practice: from problemsolving to strengths-based assessmentKim RochelleIndependentdr.kimrochelle@gmail.comDr Kate Saunders, CEO of BDA, advocates theprinciple that individuals should leave theassessment “two inches taller”, knowing thatthere is a reason for their difficulties and havingan awareness of their strengths. This workshopwill draw upon theory and practice from positivepsychology to explore methods of incorporatingquantitative and qualitative strengths-basedassessment into practice. Assessment offers a‘turning point’ for individuals with dyslexia.However, late identification, academicexpectations and daily effort-achievementconflict increases the risk of anxiety, low selfimage,learned helplessness and problematic relationships. Thus, assessment also offersthe chance for a change in thinking stylefrom negative to positive: the challenge topractitioners moving forward.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 16:35 - 17:20 GMT
Breakout Room 5

16:35 GMT

Spotting SLI in the Classroom: Using Video Clips in Training Teachers to Identify Underlying Language Difficulties
Spotting SLI in the Clarroom: Using Video Clipsin Training Teachers to Identify UnderlyingLanguage DifficultiesBecky Clarkralli.contact@gmail.comLanguage difficulties frequently co-occur withdyslexia and are often the underlying cause ofliteracy difficulties. Despite the high prevalenceof language impairments, and despite thesignificant impact on learning in the classroomand attainment, professionals have limitedtraining about identification of these disorders.Language difficulties are heterogeneous,signs can be subtle and a confusing range ofterminology is used to describe them. Thissession aims: (i) To raise awareness of languageimpairments and current terminology (ii) To raiseawareness of film resources available that canassist in teacher training/ support for parents (iii)To show how different types of spoken languagedifficulties impact learning to read.The RALLI YouTube channel, devised toincrease awareness of language difficulties,has received over 330,000 views across over200 countries with reports of use in teachertraining and university teaching. The channelprovides accessible and free resources. Thisworkshop will use film excerpts in order tofocus on terminological issues and methodsof supporting training of teachers to identifylanguage difficulties (including sign posting offurther resources). Participants will considerwhat training is needed to improve awarenessand knowledge of language difficulties in theireducational environments and how they impactlearning to read.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 16:35 - 17:20 GMT
Auditorium

16:35 GMT

Tackling Dyslexia in Schools – a Phonics-Based, Whole-School Literacy Approach
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Tackling Dyslexia in Schools – a phonics-based,whole-school literacy approachChristopher White, Sophie Killockc.white@poolehigh.poole.sch.ukCo-authors: Sophie Killock, King Edward VICommunity College (KEVICC)The specific needs of dyslexic students strugglingwith word recognition and phonetic strategiesfor reading are often not amply addressedby schools. In this workshop, teachers andresearchers will discuss the results of a newsoftware-based literacy intervention in severalsecondaries in England. The aim is to develop adiagnostic tool for teachers through personaliseddifferentiated word lists. Secondary schoolsubject teachers who need to implementreading and writing strategies effectively intheir subjects, senior leaders who wish to trackintervention and measure impact, and policymakers who are looking for a possible strategyfor tackling whole school literacy in places otherthan English classrooms. Teachers must considernot only subject-specific vocabulary, but bemindful of the thinking/writing speed neededfor linear exams at 16. AEN pupils require smartplanning to include the teaching of reading/phonics in non-English lessons. Subject staffmust explicitly address deficits in students’skills, embedding them productively in everydayclassroom teaching.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 16:35 - 17:20 GMT
Breakout Room 6

16:35 GMT

Using the Executive Function Model to Help Understand and Support a Range of Specific Learning Differences
Limited Capacity seats available

Using the Executive Function Model to HelpUnderstand and Support a Range of SpecificLearning DifferencesKarisa KrcmarLoughborough Universityk.krcmar@lboro.ac.ukExecutive Functions are mental processesthat perform & control a range of complextasks. Traditionally associated with ADHD,this approach can be applied to help supportstudents with a range of specific learningdifferences. Considerations of EF can help withstudent metacognition and this approach canhelp us apply our knowledge for more confidentstudy support across a range of students,specialist teachers and practitioners. Delegatesare asked to come with a student in mind andwe will explore how considerations of executivefunctions can help with student metacognitionand how this approach can help us apply ourknowledge for more confident study supportacross a range of students. Using an ExecutiveFunction model with students can help us applyour knowledge for more confident study supportacross a range of students with SpLDs andmental health concerns.

Speakers

Thursday March 10, 2016 16:35 - 17:20 GMT
Breakout Room 1

17:20 GMT

Dyslexia and English Language Learners - Beliefs and Research Evidence
Abstract: With the high number of immigrants and refugees to Europe, North America and theAustralian continent, most of whom do not speak the societal language or adhere to the culturaltraditions of the receiving country, it is important to be skilled in assessment of culturally andlinguistically diverse children and adolescents who may have a learning disability (LD). Issuespertaining to the assessment of L2 children who may have a learning disability (LD) have beencontroversial and challenging due to factors related to over-identification of L2 as LD (Cummins,1984) and under-identification of L2 with LD (Limbos & Geva, 2001).This keynote will begin with a brief discussion of beliefs held by some professionals with regardto whether, when, and how to assess potential LD in L2. Some of these are supported by theresearch but others are not. I will then touch briefly on pertinent theoretical frameworks (whatis universal – what is language specific; L1-L2 transfer; the simple view or reading; development).The presentation will then shift to a description of outcomes of longitudinal studies conducted inmy lab in Toronto on the cognitive, language and literacy development of typically and atypicallyBDA 10th International ConferencePage 16 Introductiondeveloping English Language Learners (ELLs) and their monolingual peers. This research shedslight on these beliefs and informs the last part of the presentation – a brief discussion of “Do’sand Don’ts” in the assessment of LD who are ELLs.

Chair
Keynote
PE

Professor Esther Geva

Biography: Esther Geva studied in Israel, the US and Canada, and is a Full Professor in thedepartment of Applied Psychology and Human Development, at the Ontario Institute for studiesin education (OISE), University of Toronto. She is also a licensed psychologist Esther is multilingualand... Read More →


Thursday March 10, 2016 17:20 - 18:05 GMT
Auditorium

18:05 GMT

 
Friday, March 11
 

08:30 GMT

Registration and Coffee
Friday March 11, 2016 08:30 - 09:30 GMT
Venue

09:30 GMT

Associations and Dissociations of Deficits in Reading, Spelling and Arithmetic
Title: Associations and Dissociations of Deficits in Reading, Spelling, and Arithmetic.Abstract: Although deficits in reading, spelling, and arithmetic can occur in isolation (i.e. in thecontext of otherwise typical development), recent prevalence studies clearly show co-morbiditybetween these problems. Nevertheless, dyslexia and dyscalculia are associated with distinctneuro-cognitive profiles (dyslexia: phonological deficit; dyscalculia: numerical processing deficit),with additive deficits in children with comorbid dyslexia + dyscalculia. Interestingly, recentempirical evidence suggests that deficits in reading or spelling can dissociate. Many childrenshow specifically poor spelling in combination with age-adequate reading skills or specificallypoor reading in combination with age-adequate spelling. Early deficits in phonologicalawareness are observed in children who later on develop problems with orthographic spelling,however, they are not evident among isolated poor readers. Dysfluent reading in the absenceof spelling problems is probably best explained by deficits in the fast access from visual symbolsto phonological representations (indicated by a marked and persistent deficit in naming speed).Theories of learning disorders need to explain associations as well as dissociations betweendisorders.

Chair
Keynote
PK

Professor Karin Landerl

Biography: During and after her PhD from the Univ. of Salzburg, Karin Landerl was a visitingfellow at the MRC Cognitive Development Unit, London, the UCL Centre of CognitiveNeuroscience, London, the Paedologisch Instituut at the Free University Amsterdam andthe Centre for Reading... Read More →


Friday March 11, 2016 09:30 - 10:15 GMT
Auditorium

10:15 GMT

Coffee Break and posters
Friday March 11, 2016 10:15 - 10:30 GMT
Venue

10:30 GMT

Prediction of Reading Difficulties: The Contribution of a Dynamic Test of Decoding
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The aim of the study was to examine thepredictive validity of a dynamic test of decoding.Specifically, our research question was: Cana language-neutral, dynamic test of decodingadministered to kindergarten children add tothe prediction of reading disabilities at theend of Grade 2 – after rigorous control forletter knowledge, phonemic awareness, rapidautomatized naming, and early reading?We used a dynamic test of decoding (Elbro etal., 2012) in which participants are taught threenovel letters and how to synthesize the lettersounds into new words by means of non-verbalinstructions. This dynamic test was administeredalong with traditional tests of reading, letterknowledge and phonological awareness to 158kindergarten children before the onset of formalreading instruction. At the end of Grade 2,traditional tests of reading were administered tothe same children.The dynamic test of decoding was the singlebest kindergarten predictor of children’s readingabilities at the end of Grade 2. The dynamictest contributed significantly to the predictionof reading disabilities in grade 2 even afterrigorous control for letter knowledge, phonemicawareness, rapid automatized naming, andearly reading. The dynamic test of decodingis a promising tool to identifying kindergartenchildren at risk for future reading disabilities.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 10:30 - 10:48 GMT
Breakout Room 4

10:30 GMT

Using Morphological Strategies to Improve Dyslexic and Non-Dyslexic Undergraduates’ Spelling
Limited Capacity filling up

Using morphological strategies to improvedyslexic and non-dyslexic undergraduates’spellingVictoria DevonshireUniversity of Portsmouthvictoria.devonshire@port.ac.ukCo-author: Alexa Walsh, University ofPortsmouthUndergraduate students’ spelling is oftencriticized and spelling errors are oftenpenalized in exams and coursework. Analysis ofspelling errors suggest that spelling errors arephonologically plausible but morphologicallyincorrect. We wanted to see whether amorphological spelling intervention wouldimprove both dyslexic and non-dyslexic students’spelling. Undergraduate psychology studentswere recruited for this study, 44 were dyslexicstudents and 58 non-dyslexic. They were testedon the standardised WIAT-II UK test and aspelling test specifically designed for the study.They were tested a second time, a week later, onthe same tests with an additional list of wordsnot tested before. The training consisted of apowerpoint presentation given to small groupswhich highlighted the morphological structure ofwords. A 2 x 2 (Time of testing x dyslexic or not)ANOVA was performed on the data to assess theimpact of morphological training. All studentsperformed significantly better on all tests aftermorphological training. On the standardised testit was also found that after intervention dyslexicstudents reached the same point that nondyslexicstudents were at before intervention;thus the improvement for dyslexic participantswas large. This study has demonstrated thatnot only is morphological training effective forboth dyslexic and non-dyslexic groups but thatit is also effective for older students past thesensitive period of literacy learning acquisition.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 10:30 - 10:48 GMT
Breakout Room 3

10:30 GMT

The Second Coming of William Caxton: Transparent Orthography or Visible Etymology?
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The Second Coming of William Caxton:Transparent Orthography or VisibleEtymology?Eleanor MachinSpecialist Tutor in SpLDe.machin@sheffield.ac.ukA fun and thought-provoking w/shop, aimingto consider spelling reform and standardisedspelling in terms of the phonological difficultiesexperienced by those with dyslexia. Attendeeswill have the opportunity to learn phonemicspelling using the multi-sensory methodsemployed for learners with SpLDs and alphabetswhich allow for a transparent orthography (IPA,Saxon-Spanglish and Quikscript). Interactiveactivity: learning a chosen ‘transparent’ alphabetusing multi-sensory methods and taking partin reading and writing exercises using this. Iwould ideally like to try this with groups withvarious accents in order to provoke debateover pronunciation and spelling. Discussionin small groups around the importance ofetymology and what could be lost with atransparent orthography and whether or notthis is outweighed by the benefits. We may alsodiscuss practical implications if time allows.Possibilities in a changing world: This workshophas been an extreme example of how thingscould change, but is intended to be thoughtprovoking- possibly raising more questionsthan it answers. Although a complete spellingreform is highly unlikely any time soon, Englishis undeniably morphing. Is there any way we canuse this evolution to help those with dyslexia?

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 10:30 - 11:15 GMT
Breakout Room 6

10:30 GMT

Teaching Children with Dyslexia: What’s Proven and What’s Not
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Teaching Children with Dyslexia: What’s Provenand What’s NotValerie MuterUniversity College Londonv.muter@btinternet.comThis workshop explores the wide range ofinterventions developed to help amelioratereading difficulties in children with dyslexia.While teaching methodologies aimed at tacklingliteracy difficulties at the cognitive (phonological)and behavioural (phonic) levels are wellsupported by research studies, interventionsdeveloped from biologically-based neurosciencetheory (though becoming increasingly popular)are more controversial. This workshop aims toprovide teachers with a methodology for judgingwhether a given intervention is well groundedand validated in both theory and practice byemphasising the importance of randomisedcontrolled trials (RCTs) in determining theefficacy of new teaching methodologies.Examples of good versus inadequate CRTs willbe presented and delegates will be given theopportunity to participate in discussions ofwhether a proposed intervention lives up to itsclaims.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 10:30 - 11:45 GMT
Breakout Room 5

10:30 GMT

Desirable Dyslexia: A Positive Psychology Approach
Limited Capacity seats available

Desirable Dyslexia: A Positive PsychologyApproachChathurika KannangaraUniversity of BoltonC.Kannangara@bolton.ac.ukDyslexia is often discussed and considered asthe condition that affects the learning process inareas such as reading, and spelling. Very rarelydoes research look at how individuals uniquelyadapt to this condition, using their ‘other’assortment of abilities or strengths to copewith the presenting challenges. This symposiumwill bring together a series of research andpractices which are aimed at exploring ways tohelp dyslexics perform in their optimal self andhow to help them do so by strengthening thestrengths.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 10:30 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 2

10:30 GMT

Developmental Dyslexia in Different Orthographies: Moving forward: challenges and transitions
Limited Capacity seats available

Developmental Dyslexia in DifferentOrthographies: Moving forward: challenges andtransitionsTaeko Wydelltaeko.wydell@brunel.ac.ukThe characteristics of different orthographiespresent different challenges when childrenacquire literacy. In English (Print-Soundtranslation is not always regular) PhonologicalAwareness-PA, and Rapid AutomatizedNaming-RAN are the most potent predictors.In morphographic Chinese/Japanese Kanji (P-Stranslation is opaque) Visual Cognition is a morepotent predictor than PA/RAN. In contrast,Korean Hangul/Japanese Kana (P-S translation isregular) Visual Cognition, PA, RAN, and ReceptiveVocabulary are the best predictors. Thusorthography is the key to understand dyslexia.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 10:30 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 1

10:30 GMT

Using Technology to Overcome Difficulties Associated with SpLD: Success Stories and Lessons Learnt
Using technology to overcome difficultiesassociated with SpLD: success stories andlessons learntAbi JamesUniversity of Southampton a.james@soton.ac.ukThis symposium, led by members of theBDA New Technologies Committee, will giveattendees the opportunity to learn aboutsome of the technology-based strategies thatcan help children and adults remove digitalaccessibility barriers confronting individuals with Specific Learning Difficulties. Drawing on theirexperiences of working within schools, collegesand the workplace, the speakers will report onhow technology-based tools have been usedin different settings, discuss factors impactingsuccessful implementation as well as introduceattendees to some of the latest technologiesavailable.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 10:30 - 12:00 GMT
Auditorium

10:48 GMT

Beyond the Broom-Cupboard: The Wider Impact of Specialist Dyslexia Training for Teaching Assistants
Limited Capacity seats available

Beyond the Broom Cupboard: the Wider Impactof Specialist Dyslexia Training for TeachingAssistantsKathleen Kelly & Dominic GriffithsManchester Metropolitan University, UKdominic.griffiths@mmu.ac.ukThe Rose Review (2009) identified the need forschools to develop their capacities to supportchildren with dyslexia through developingstaff knowledge and expertise. Whilst Roserecommended the training of many moredyslexia specialist teachers, the reality for manyEnglish schools has been that it is teachingassistants (TAs) who are actually teachingstructured programmes to support dyslexicchildren. It has been important, therefore, todevelop specialist dyslexia training courses forthese key members of the workforce. Thesehave ranged from informal school-based trainingto formal accredited courses, such as theAccredited Learning Support Assistant (ALSA)qualification, developed by the British DyslexiaAssociation (BDA).The present study examined the impact of thistraining on 21 TAs in two English urban LocalAuthorities. Semi-structured interviews soughtto tease out how this training had developedtrainees’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviours,to what extent TAs were carrying out the rangeof roles for which they were qualified and whatcontextual factors might be enabling or blocking their impact. Implications for TA deployment,support and further professional developmentare discussed, as well as implications for TAdyslexia training programme design.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 10:48 - 11:08 GMT
Breakout Room 3

10:48 GMT

Working Memory Deficits in Children with Dyslexia: Beyond Phonology
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Working Memory Deficits in Children withDyslexia: Beyond PhonologyShelley GrayArizona State UniversityShelley.Gray@asu.eduCo-authors: Tiffany Hogan, MGH Institute ofHealth Professions; Mary Alt, University ofArizona; Samuel Green, Arizona State University;Shara Brinkley, Arizona State University; NelsonCowan, University of Missouri - ColumbiaRecent research suggests that children withdyslexia, who typically demonstrate deficits inphonological working memory, also demonstratedeficits in visuospatial working memory;however, this finding is inconsistent. If childrenwith dyslexia have deficits in both, this raises thequestion of whether they can successfully bindphonological and visuospatial information, whichis crucial for learning. The purpose of this studywas to compare groups of children with dyslexiaand TD on a wide variety of working memorytasks to determine whether between-groupdifferences emerged. A total of 247 secondgraders (168 TD, 79 dyslexic) completed theComprehensive Assessment Battery for Children– Working Memory that included 18 workingmemory tasks presented in a computer-basedgame environment [8 central executive (CE), 3phonological loop, 4 visuospatial sketchpad, 3episodic buffer]. CE tasks assessed inhibition,mental set shifting, and updating.Phonological and visuospatial tasks includedrunning and standard versions. Episodic buffertasks assessed within- and between-modalitybinding. Between-group differences were assessed using separate MANCOVAs. Scoresfor the dyslexic group were significantly lowerthan the TD group on phonological looptasks, updating tasks, on visual span fixed andrunning, and on location span running. Poorerperformance on the updating and running taskssuggests that the dyslexic group had difficultymonitoring and updating both auditory andvisuospatial information, a result which cannotbe explained solely by phonological deficits.Differences did not extend to binding tasks,raising the possibility that an episodic buffermechanism helped the dyslexic group store and/or process phonological information.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 10:48 - 11:08 GMT
Breakout Room 4

11:08 GMT

Benefit from Statistical Regularities in Language - for Adequate Readers and Among Dyslexics
Limited Capacity seats available

Benefit from statistical regularities in language -for adequate readers and among DyslexicsEva KimelHebrew University of Jerusalemeva.kelman@mail.huji.ac.ilCo-authors: Merav AhissarThe “Anchoring Deficit” hypothesis (Ahissar etal., 2006) suggests that Dyslexics have a difficultyin automatic extraction of stimulus regularities insound sequences. This suggestion is supportedby experimental findings using verbal and nonverbalstimuli, where novel regularities wereintroduced during the session. The current studywas aimed to assess the impact of long-termregularities in language, which listeners had lifelong experience with (e.g. their native language).Our assumption was that this familiarity wouldenhance Controls’ performance more thanDyslexics’. We addressed this question in aseries of three experiments: Syllable Span withfrequent Consonant-Vowel and infrequentVowel-Consonant syllables, Digit Span in Englishand Hebrew, and an auditory vocabularyacquisition experiment, in which some ofthe words had a familiar structure (Hebrewmorphology) and some did not. 27 Dyslexic and33 Controls participated in the study.All subjects were adult native Hebrew speakersand performed general cognitive, reading andphonological tasks. Conservative non-parametricstatistical methods were used (e.g. Mann-Whitney U-test). In all three tasks there was acondition for which information accumulatedover the life span could be utilized, and therewas a condition which was less familiar, lessfrequent or irregular. Consistent with theextension of the Anchoring Deficit hypothesis, inall three experiments Dyslexics did not benefitas much as Controls from the long term statisticsassociated with the input. These results suggestthat Dyslexics could not compensate for thedeficit despite multiple exposures to lingualinput with the same statistics.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 11:08 - 11:24 GMT
Breakout Room 4

11:08 GMT

Clinical Implications of the Double Deficit Model for Adolescents with Dyslexia
Limited Capacity filling up

Clinical Implications of the Double DeficitModel for Adolescents with DyslexiaAllyson HarrisonQueen’s Universityharrisna@queensu.caPresently, there is considerable support forboth the phonological core deficit model ofDyslexia as well as evidence to support namingspeed deficits as primarily contributing tothis disability. Wolf and Bower (1993; 1999)proposed that many students with Dyslexiamight also be impaired in both underlyingprocesses, calling this the Double Deficit model.This study investigated whether 137 Canadianadolescent Dyslexics could be categorizedinto subtypes according to the presence orabsence of phonological deficts alone, namingspeed deficits alone, or a combination ofthe two. 137 Dyslexic subjects aged 11-14were seen for updated psychoeducationalassessments in a program designed to assiststudents with Dyslexia in making the transitionfrom elementary to secondary school. All hadprevious diagnoses of Dyslexia.Tests administered included the ComprehensiveTest of Phonological Processing, WechslerIntelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition,Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-SecondEdition, the Wide Range Assessment of Memoryand Learning – Second Edition, the Test of WordReading Efficiency, and the Processing Speedmeasures from the Woodcock Johnson –III.Results support the existence of both single anddouble deficit groups, and confirm that thosewith both deficits are the most severely impairedacross multiple measures.Contrary to previous research, most adolescentswere classified as either naming speed only orDouble Deficit, and about a third of the grouphad deficits in naming speed deficit with intactphonological skills. This may suggest that whileearly phonological deficits are amenable toremediation, identification of language symbolsfails to become automatized in children withDyslexia and may require more targetedintervention.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 11:08 - 11:24 GMT
Breakout Room 3

11:15 GMT

Bilingualism and Dyslexia: an Interactive Welsh Perspective
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Bilingualism and Dyslexia: an interactive WelshperspectiveRhiannon Packer, Trystan Williams, Claire JonesUniversity of South WalesRhiannon.packer@decymru.ac.ukAppropriate and comprehensive support forWelsh speaking pupils with dyslexia is an areaof need in Wales. USW has developed theALSA course in Welsh to be delivered mainly viawebinars and discussion forums. The workshopwill outline the experiences surrounding deliveryand identification of specific need in developinga course pertinent to a varied bilingual workforce.This innovative method of delivery aims to raiseawareness of bilingualism (in this case Welshand English) and dyslexia requires considerationby teachers, head teachers and practitioners inthe fieldIt is important to provide appropriate andrelevant training for all practitioners ineducation. 1 in 6 pupils in Britain are bilingualand therefore courses providing support forbilingual pupils with SpLD are necessary andfeasible. It is vital that SpLDs are not consideredfrom an English only perspective. 

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 11:15 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 5

11:15 GMT

‘Consistently Inconsistent’ - part of the Maths SpLD Profile. Can we help?
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‘Consistently Inconsistent’ – part of the MathsSpLD profile. Can we help?Sarah WedderburnUnicornmathssarahwedderburn@unicornmaths.comStudents with a SpLD in maths will be ableto manipulate a concept one week and beunable to tackle a similar problem the next.This practical session will demonstrate athree pronged approach to enable studentsto be more independent workers; ensurereal understanding of the concept, run aspiral overlearning/revisiting programme,strategies to make prose maths problems morecomprehensible.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 11:15 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 6

11:24 GMT

Language-based Literacy Intervention: A Description of Three Clinical Cases
Limited Capacity filling up

Language-based literacy intervention: Adescription of three (messy) clinical casesElizabeth Nadler-NirThe Reading and Language Gym, Cape Town,South AfricaCo-authors: Lindsay Peer (Peer GordonAssociates), Michelle Pascoe (Division ofCommunication Sciences and DisordersUniversity of Cape Town, South Africa)elizabeth@myliteracygym.co.zaWe describe three cases from clinical practicewhich illustrate a) How reading barriers seldompresent in a pure form and how co-morbidconditions such as pervasive developmentaldisorder, dyspraxia, anxiety and ADHD cancomplicate intervention; and, b) Why it isimportant to provide intensive, target-specificreading intervention to “wire up the readingcircuitry” in the brain, an analogy used by Wolf(2008).An online remedial programme, The VirtualReading Gym™ (VRG™), was piloted as part ofthe intervention as it meets criteria of beingintensive, targeted and multimodal.Three clinical case studies will be presented.Child A (12 years) had a neuro-biological base tohis difficulties. He was diagnosed with Asperger’sSyndrome; reading and school refusal. Child B(16 years) was learning in a second languageand was diagnosed with a language learningimpairment, verbal dyspraxia and significantreading barriers. Child C (10 years) had anexpressive speech and language-based learningbarrier with low reading accuracy, rate andcomprehension. Pre and post-assessment resultsare presented for each child, together with adescription of the intervention.All three children made gains in terms of reading accuracy, rate and comprehension as measuredby the VRG™ programme. The children weremotivated by the intervention and enjoyedworking through it. The study highlightedsome changes necessary in the VRG™, e.g.more reading passages are required per level.Limitations of this dataset, arising from clinicalpractice, are discussed. The positive clinicaloutcomes obtained in this study suggest thatthe VRG™ should be evaluated further in amore rigorous, larger scale intervention studywith application in the school system using peermentors.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 11:24 - 11:42 GMT
Breakout Room 4

11:24 GMT

Responding to Intervention: Distinct Effects of Tier 2 Supports for Poor Readers in Year 1 -
Limited Capacity seats available

Responding to Intervention: Distinct effects of‘tier 2’ supports for poor readers in Year 1Robert SavageMcGill Universityrobert.savage@mcgill.caCo-authors: Eileen Wood & Alexandra GottardoWilfrid, Laurier UniversityOur study explores the effects of Responseto-Intervention (RtI) in a field-experiment.We sought to establish that small groupinterventions for at-risk children (‘tier 2interventions’) produced additional effectsto those of documented quality regular ‘tier1’ teaching. Our work is important becauseprevious positive results might reflect remedialeffects of tier 2 work after (undocumented) poortier 1 teaching, not additional effects, as widelyassumed. In addition we sought to explorewhether best-practice tier 2 phonic work canbe optimized using a novel ‘dynamic’ phonicapproach.

Friday March 11, 2016 11:24 - 11:42 GMT
Breakout Room 3

11:42 GMT

Effects of a Randomised Reading Intervention: A Five Year Follow-Up
Limited Capacity filling up

Effects of a randomised reading intervention: a5-year follow-upUlrika WolffUniversity of Gothenburgulrika.wolff@ped.gu.seA Swedish multi-component interventionprogram was developed and implemented ina randomised intervention study for 9-yearolds in Grade 3. The present study reports on a5-year follow-up when students were in Grade8. The main aim was to investigate if there wereremaining effects of the intervention on readingrelated skills. An additional aim was to examineif the children identified as poor readers inGrade 2 still performed worse than typicalreaders on reading related skills five years later.Participants in the original reading interventionstudy were identified as poor readers basedon a screening battery (N=2 212) by the end ofGrade 2. The intervention group (n=57) received40 minutes of one-to-one instruction per dayfor twelve weeks. The control group (n=55) tookpart in ordinary classroom activities. Previous analyses using structured equation modellingshowed that the intervention group performedsignificantly better than the control group onspelling, reading speed, reading comprehensionand phoneme awareness at the immediate posttestwith sustained effects one year later.Preliminary analyses show that there were nosignificant differences between the interventiongroup and the control group on workingmemory, vocabulary, spelling, reading speed andreading comprehension, but on word decoding.There was also a significant interaction effectof group assignment and initial word decoding,in the way that the lowest performing studentsbenefitted the most from the intervention. Agroup of typically developing students (n = 66)outperformed the students identified as poorreaders in Grade 2, on WM, vocabulary, spelling,reading comprehension and word decoding.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 11:42 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 3

11:42 GMT

Enhancing Dyslexic’s Reading Fluency in English as a Foreign Language
Limited Capacity filling up

Enhancing dyslexic’s reading fluency in Englishas a foreign languagePatrick SnellingsUniversity of Amsterdamp.snellings@uva.nlCo-authors: Lisanne van den Hoek, RenskeEijsvogel, Barbara de RidderThe study determines whether dyslexic childrenwho have learned a transparent language arestill slower than regular readers when learningan opaque foreign language such as English. Asecond aim is to determine whether readingspeed can be enhanced with a computerizedtraining programme. In this study 35 dyslexic and38 regular children were compared on a test ofspeeded single word reading in Dutch and on asentence reading task in English. The two groupswere each trained in reading the same sentencesin two conditions: at their own speed or in aspeeded version. After training children wereagain tested on sentence reading speed. Resultswere analysed with repeated measures ANOVA.Dyslexics were also slower than regular readerswhen reading in a foreign language. All groupsimproved reading speed in the foreign languageyet there were differential effects betweendyslexic and regular readers. Regular readersbenefited equally from own speed and speededreading. Dyslexic readers benefited more fromspeeded reading. This study shows that sentencereading training is beneficial for all readersyet dyslexics are in need of instruction thatspecifically addresses their speed problems

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 11:42 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 4

12:00 GMT

Lunch and posters
Friday March 11, 2016 12:00 - 13:00 GMT
Venue

13:00 GMT

Exploring the Role of Knowledge Transfer on Passage Comprehension in Children with Learning Differences: An Exploratory Study
Title:Exploring the Role of Knowledge Transfer on Passage Comprehension in Children withLearning Differences: An Exploratory Study.Abstract: There is overwhelming evidence supporting the primary role of background knowledgein facilitating the construction of a coherent situation model during reading (McNamara &Kintsch, 1996; Rawson & Van Overschelde, 2008). The situation model involves the intertwiningof the reader’s background knowledge with the text-based representation to form a deeprepresentation of the text. Thus, the situation model is a more meaningful representation thatgoes beyond the text-based information (Kintsch, 1988), is cumulative, and evolves as oneprogresses through the text. The resulting situation model represents a rich elaborated structureof events, actions, objects, and people involved in the text organized in a manner consistentwith the reader’s knowledge. This has prompted us to conceptualize reading comprehensionas the accumulation of knowledge across time and more specifically across texts, through bothreading and listening. We assume the buildup of knowledge occurs as children encounter newinformation in text that is then integrated within their existing knowledge structures. Thus,connecting new knowledge into existing knowledge structures would seem to be critical inacquiring knowledge across time and learning opportunities. However, little work has beendone examining how and when children draw upon their existing background knowledge tounderstand new information encountered in text. Additionally, the cognitive processes thatcontribute to individual differences in the application of reader knowledge to new situations/information in text have not been investigated.The AIM Academy Clubs offer a natural experiment to examine how existing knowledgestructures affect the comprehension of new information in text along with the cognitiveprocesses that facilitate the linking of existing reader knowledge with new informationencountered in text. In this presentation I will present initial results from an experimentalmeasurement study examining the relation between domain knowledge and passagecomprehension among fifth grade students enrolled at Aim Academy, ConshohockenPennsylvania. We were interested in whether students would leverage content learned in clubto learn analogous topics outside of club more easily. Furthermore, we’re interested in thecognitive processes that enable students to transfer and build knowledge within and acrossdomains

Chair
Keynote
PD

Professor Don Compton

Biography: Donald Compton is Professor of Psychology at Florida State University/FloridaCenter for Reading Research. He was formerly Professor and Chair of Special Education anda John F. Kennedy Center Investigator at Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. He earned aPh.D. from Northwestern... Read More →


Friday March 11, 2016 13:00 - 13:45 GMT
Auditorium

13:45 GMT

Children at Family-Risk of Reading Difficulties: Modelling the Early Path of Emergent Literacy Skills and Home Literacy Environment (HLE) at School Start -
Limited Capacity filling up

Children at Family-Risk of Reading Difficulties:Modeling the Early Path of Emergent LiteracySkills and Home Literacy Environment (HLE) atSchool StartZahra Esmaeeli (National Reading Centre, Centrefor Reading Education and Reading Research,University of Stavanger, Norway), KjerstiLundetræ (National Reading Centre, Centrefor Reading Education and Reading Research,University of Stavanger, Norway), Fiona Kyle(School of Health Science, City UniversityLondon)Zahra.esmaeeli@uis.noIt is well established that reading difficulties runin family. Regarding children at family-risk (FR children), a consistent group deficit has beenfound in Emergent Literacy Skills. However,research on developmental dyslexia has alsoshown that combinations of various types –environmental and demographic factors alsoprovide important and meaningful insight intodevelopment of children’s Emergent LiteracySkills. The current study investigates the role ofHLE, parents’ education, gender, and years inkindergarten in Emergent Literacy Skills in FRand NOT-FR (Not family-risk) children.The sample includes children from the OnTrack Project including of FR (N = 214) andNOT-FR (N = 634) based on parents’ self-reportof reading difficulties. The participants wereassessed at first grade entry in Emergent LiteracySkills including Letter Knowledge, PhonemicAwareness, Vocabulary, and Word Reading.Parents answered a questionnaire regardingdemographics, HLE (parents’ reading habits,parent-child shared reading etc.). The dataare analyzed based on the modeling of theassociations between HLE and Emergent LiteracySkills within a SEM framework.Analyses showed that the FR children had poorEmergent Literacy Skills as compared to NOT-FRindividuals. In addition, a richer HLE was foundfor NOT-FR children. The results may suggesta greater risk of reading difficulties for the FRchildren. Furthermore, regression analyseswithin each group indicated that HLE, parents’education, gender, and years in kindergartenpredicted Emergent Literacy Skills in both FR andNot-FR children. These results are also discussedin relation to the modeling of the associationsbetween HLE and Emergent Literacy skills whilecontrolling for gender, years in kindergarten, andparents’ level of education in SEM framework.The results add to our knowledge of how familialrisk, HLE and demographic factors relates toEmergent Literacy Skills at school start.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 13:45 - 14:03 GMT
Breakout Room 4

13:45 GMT

The Hidden Maths Content in HE Courses: A Survey
Limited Capacity seats available

The Hidden Maths content in HE courses: ASurveySteve Chinn University of Derby steve.chinn@btinternet.comCo-authors: Steve Chinn, Clare TrottThe study is a survey of the implications ofunexpected maths content and/or depth ofcontent of maths in undergraduate coursesat Universities in the UK Through experiencethe authors have had considerable informalinformation about this being a serious problemto a significant number of undergraduates oncourses such as sports science and psychology.We wish to draw attention to this problem, givesome sense of the extent of the problem andencourage greater transparency for studentswhen they view information on potentialcourses of study. The data was collected usingSmart Survey. A questionnaire was sent to allADSHE and NADP members as well as SIGMA,Dis-forum and SpLD mailing lists. Some 60+responses were analysed. The questionnairewas designed to target our key areas of interestand to lead to a quantitative sense of theextent of the problem. Analysis was primarilyvia frequency distributions. This is current/ongoingresearch so our results are incomplete asare our conclusions. However, it would appearthat support staff in Universities do see a highpercentage of students who are unaware of themaths content and/or its extent when they starttheir courses.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 13:45 - 14:03 GMT
Breakout Room 3

13:45 GMT

BDA Dyslexia Friendly Quality Mark: Impact in the Classroom, UK and European Centres Schools
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BDA Dyslexia Friendly Quality Mark – Impactin the Classroom, UK and European CentresSchoolsJoanne GregoryBritish Dyslexia Association joanneg@bdadyslexia.org.uk We will examine introducing a framework withina European educational setting, as seen withinthe VETO Project, reporting on the experiencesof the partner organisations. The talk willconclude with the collation of key elements ofsimilarity across the UK and European settingsto establish a clear pathway for introducing BDADyslexia Friendly Quality Mark framework withinsuch centres of learning.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 13:45 - 14:30 GMT
Breakout Room 6

13:45 GMT

Has Handwriting become an Instructional Dinosaur? Handwriting may be more Important than you think!
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Has Handwriting Become an InstructionalDinosaur? Handwriting May Be More ImportantThan You Think!Nancy Cushen WhiteUniversity of California, San Francisconancycushenwhite@gmail.comHandwriting is complex involving both cognitiveand motor skills. A foundational skill for literacy,it influences reading, written expression andcritical thinking. Sequential hand movements during handwriting activate brain regionsassociated with thinking, working memory, andlanguage. Cross-disciplinary research showsthat handwriting is a critical skill to teach frompreschool to high school.A note-taking study comparing keyboardingand handwriting showed better comprehensionand retention of content for hand writers.Elementary students composing by hand, notkeyboarding, wrote faster, longer pieces withmore ideas.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 13:45 - 14:30 GMT
Breakout Room 5

13:45 GMT

Comorbidity, Executive Function, Stress and Strengths in Dyslexia
Comorbidity, Executive Function, Stress and Strengths of Dyslexia Rod NicolsonUniversity of Sheffieldr.nicolson@sheffield.ac.ukWorking within a procedural learning deficit anddelayed neural commitment framework, thissymposium examines dyslexia across the agerange, considering strengths and weaknesses ina series of controlled experimental studies.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 13:45 - 15:15 GMT
Auditorium

13:45 GMT

Nonword and Irregular Word Reading in Young Children
Limited Capacity seats available

Nonword and irregular word reading in youngchildrenAnna CunninghamCoventry Universityanna.cunningham@coventry.ac.ukIn 2012, a Year 1 phonics screening check(including 20 nonwords and 20 regular words)was introduced for all six-year olds in the UK.Talks 1 and 2 present evidence that irregularword reading has declined and nonword readinghas improved as a consequence. Second, welook at how different cognitive skills are involvedin the two types of reading. The dual-routetheory hypothesizes two separate routes forreading nonwords/regular words (phonologicalrecoding route) and irregular words (lexicalroute). Talks 3 and 4 investigate the predictors oflexical and phonological reading respectively. 

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 13:45 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 1

13:45 GMT

Reasonable Adjustments in High-Stakes Assessments for Candidates with SpLDs
Limited Capacity seats available

Reasonable adjustments in high-stakesassessments for candidates with SpLDsAbi JamesUniversity of Southampton / BDA NewTechnologies Committeea.james@soton.ac.ukThis symposium brings together 4 speakerswho work in the field of access arrangementsand reasonable adjustments for candidateswith SpLDs and disabilities. Covering casestudies, logistics, assistive technology and policyissues, these sessions will enable delegates tounderstand some of the approaches available toimprove access to exams and assessments, aswell as exploring the impact of exam reform andtechnology use.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 13:45 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 2

14:03 GMT

The Sound Check Project: Supporting Phonics Learning at KS1 and KS2
Limited Capacity filling up

The Sound Check and Early InterventionProjects: supporting and celebrating dyslexiafriendly practice and effective literacyinterventions in primary schools.Liz Horobin, Jill Fernando, Joanne Gregory,Jillian Swinhoe, Lesley Mitchell; For Office for Public Management (OPM): Max KowalewskiBritish Dyslexia Association lizh@bdadyslexia.org.uk The DfE funded Sound Check project (2013-2015) was delivered in 27 primaries to 3 cohortsof pupils in years 2 and 3 who had failed to meetthe required level in the Phonics Check. An 18week intervention programme was deliveredby a Dyslexia Action trained teacher, using theActive Literacy Kit as the principal resource.Progress was measured by scores in thePhonics Check and by pre and post interventionstandardised tests.Qualitative measures were provided by specialistand class teacher reports. Phonics Check resultsfrom pupils in Cohort 2 (n=323) who retook thecheck in 2014, were compared with a matchedcontrol group.Mean scores for pupils re-taking the PhonicsCheck in June 2014 showed statisticallysignificant gains, increasing by 12.8 points from18.9 in 2013 to 31.6 in 2014. 66% achieved therequired level of 32 points or above. The FSMattainment gap decreased to 4 percentage pointswhile unexpected gains were made by boys andyounger pupils.Results of Cohort 2 pupils were compared witha matched control group. The latter showeda lower increase in scores and were less likelyto achieve the required standard. In all subgroupcomparisons, pupils from Cohort 2outperformed the control group.The success of the Sound Check project has ledto an additional year’s funding from the DfE forthe Early Intervention Project, which will explorethe potential of Sound Check as a TA (teachingassistant) delivered intervention. In addition,the project is piloting a three tier certificationframework which encourages and celebratesbest practice in identifying and supportingchildren who are struggling with literacy andwho may be at risk of dyslexia and other SpLD

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 14:03 - 14:21 GMT
Breakout Room 4

14:03 GMT

Working in the Weeds: Implementing Beginning Reading Supports in High Need Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

Working in the Weeds: Implementing BeginningReading Supports in High Need SchoolsMichael CoyneUniversity of Connecticutmike.coyne@uconn.eduAlthough there is widespread agreementabout the practices that accelerate beginningreading achievement, we often underestimatethe supports that schools need to build thesystems and infrastructure to implementand sustain these practices. The real work ofdeveloping these systems often happens “inthe weeds”- in the detailed-oriented and oftenmessy world of schedules, routines, meetings,and materials. This session will describe abeginning reading initiative where schoolteams worked to overcome the complexitiesinherent in implementing multi-tiered readingsupports in high need schools. Critical featuresof the beginning reading initiative included(a) commitment to reading as a school’s toppriority, (b) a school-wide reading improvementplan, (c) a school literacy leadership team, (d) acomprehensive literacy assessment system, (e)high quality classroom reading instruction forall students, (f) evidence-based supplementalintensive reading interventions for studentsat risk for reading difficulties, and (g) ongoingcoaching and professional development tosupport administrator and teacher knowledge ofreading research, practices, and systems.Evaluation analyses conducted with 917 studentsacross 40 classrooms in four schools using aninterrupted time series design indicated thatstudents who received coordinated beginningreading supports experienced substantiallygreater growth in early literacy skills and metimportant literacy benchmarks earlier thanstudents who did not receive these supports.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 14:03 - 14:21 GMT
Breakout Room 3

14:21 GMT

An Innovative Model for Continuing Professional Development
Limited Capacity seats available

An Innovative Model for ContinuingProfessional DevelopmentSharon McMurray, Claire McveighS.McMurray@Stran.ac.uk this paper considers an innovative model for thedelivery of continuing professional developmentin addressing the needs of children with literacydifficulties. The model was robustly tested overthree years on the large scale Special EducationalNeeds Continuing Professional DevelopmentLiteracy Project in Northern Ireland and wasindependently evaluated by the Education andTraining Inspectorate. Stranmillis UniversityCollege, in partnership with St Mary’s UniversityCollege, Belfast secured £4.06 million over 3years to deliver this model, in order to enableprimary school teachers in Northern Ireland toparticipate in an online course held in their ownschool and, for one teacher from each school toattend specialist face-to-face seminars taughtat Master’s level. One teacher from each schoolhad the opportunity to complete two Master’smodules and to be assessed for the awardof Approved Teacher Status from the BritishDyslexia Association.This paper discusses the design and deliveryof this continuing professional developmentprogramme using this novel integrated model. Itconsiders how this model has increased teacherconfidence and competence in meeting theneeds of children and discusses the key researchfindings indicating improved outcomes forchildren experiencing literacy difficulties.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 14:21 - 14:39 GMT
Breakout Room 3

14:21 GMT

Prediction of Individual Stability of Early Word Decoding in Incremental Phonics Instruction
Limited Capacity filling up

Individual variation in early word decodingduring incremental phonics instructionMoniek Schaars, Eliane Segers, Ludo VerhoevenRadboud University, Netherlands m.schaars@pwo.ru.nlThe purpose of this longitudinal study wasto unravel the individual variation in earlydevelopmental trajectories during the first yearof systematic incremental phonics instruction.In a representative sample, 984 Dutch childrenwere exposed to incremental subsets ofgrapheme-phoneme correspondences in 6consecutive blocks of 3 weeks of phonicsinstruction. Thereafter, 4 blocks of explicitinstruction of orthographic rules and patternsfollowed. Word decoding was monitored every3 weeks and standardized tests of simple andcomplex word decoding was conducted twicea year. Within the large cohort, we selected asubsample of 73 children with a genetic familiarrisk for dyslexia and 73 age- and school matchedchildren without known genetic risk.Structural equation modeling showed highindividual stability in the development of earlyword decoding efficiency with a strong transitionfrom the phase during which alphabeticprinciple was mastered towards a moreconsolidated phase of orthographic reading.Phonemic awareness, lexical retrieval, andverbal and visual short term memory measuredin kindergarten were found to be predictive forearly word decoding development. Analyzingthe subsamples indicated that children at riskhave a genetic disadvantage for reading fromthe very beginning of learning to read. Thisstudy highlights the importance of fine grainedattention to the early development of reading.We discuss the contribution of our findingsto the early identification of later readingproblems

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 14:21 - 14:39 GMT
Breakout Room 4

14:30 GMT

Talking Technology: using a Computer Reader in GCSE English Exams
Limited Capacity full
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Talking Technology - using a computer reader inGCSE English examsAnn-Marie McNicholasRunshaw Collegemcnicholas.a@runshaw.ac.ukCo-author: Richard MaclachlanThe workshop is about how technology canbe harnessed to help to minimise barriersto learning and, in particular, how computerreaders have been successfully utilised in GCSEEnglish exams in a further education college,where a human reader would not be allowed.Text-to-speech software and electronic resourcesare simple to use and are valuable tools, notonly in enabling students to cope with thereading requirements of the GCSE English exam,but also in increasing curriculum accessibilityand facilitating student independence.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 14:30 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 6

14:30 GMT

The Challenge of Dyslexia Strategy Coaching in the Workplace: A Framework for Effective Practice
Limited Capacity full
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The Challenge of dyslexia strategy coaching inthe workplaceCarol LeatherIndependent Dyslexia Consultantscal-idc@btconnect.comIncreasingly employers and dyslexia adultsare seeking coaching to develop strategies toimprove performance. Balancing expectationsof the employer with the needs of the individualcan be challenging. This workshop will exploregood practice: the skills and knowledge coachesneed are great as dyslexia affects everyonedifferently and strategy coaching is dependenton the job role.Coaching should be individualised and jobspecific: participants will have a framework onwhich to build programmes varying in lengthand focus. It will include: job/skills audits andthe transfer of skills to improve performance,and task analysis, self-advocacy, literacy and ITstrategies. What to say to managers- tips forpositive communication about dyslexia in theworkplace will be discussed.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 14:30 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 5

14:39 GMT

Curricula Issues for Key Stage 2 Pupils with SpLD in Literacy in English Mainstream Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Curricula issues for Key Stage 2 pupils withspecific learning difficulties (SpLD) in literacy inthe setting of mainstream education in EnglandAnna MoutraUniversity of Londonanna_moutra@hotmail.comThe Warnock Report in 1978 which suggestedthe term ‘learning difficulties’ instead of thepast terminology used in pupils’ categorisation,namely ‘mentally handicapped’ influencedsignificantly the British education legislationencouraging pupils’ inclusion within mainstreameducation (Howie, 2010, p. 758). Since then, inEngland a series of educational measures wereintroduced which aim to encourage smoothpupil accommodation in mainstream schools andto their equal access to the National Curriculum.However, a number of factors, namely schools’arrangements, labelling and delays in diagnosticassessment in combination with the changesto the National Curriculum aiming to raise thestandards for Key Stage 2 English (Departmentfor Education., 2012) can influence significantlythose pupils’ learning processes and self-esteem.Taking into account how pupils with SpLD andespecially dyslexia can learn effectively, howschools’ inclusive arrangements encourage theirlearning through their curricula and which kindof curriculum can meet efficiently their learningneeds, the main focus of this research is theschool curriculum addressed to those pupils. Theprinciple research question is ‘How can a schoolcurriculum provide effective learning and equalopportunities to pupils with SpLD for literacy atKey Stage 2?’Semi-structured interviews and classroomobservations have been conducted withinthree case studies of English mainstreamprimary schools in London area. The sample ofrespondents included pupils aged 9-10 identifiedeither by official diagnosis or by their teachersin relation to SpLD and especially to dyslexia,their parents as well as head teachers andmembers of the teaching staff. For the analysisof interviews, observations and documents ofthe pupils’ writing in literacy, a grounded theoryapproach was used and more specifically athematic analysis was undertaken.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 14:39 - 14:57 GMT
Breakout Room 3

14:39 GMT

Is the Phonic Screening Check a Major Cause of Pupils’ Difficulties in Learning to Read?
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Is the Phonic Screening Check a Major Cause ofPupils’ Difficulties in Learning to Read?Jonathan SolityOptimaCo-author: Cat Darnellinfo@krm-per.comThe annual Phonics Screening Check (PSC) wasintroduced in 2012 to assess pupils’ acquisitionof GPCs at the end of Year 1. The AssessmentFramework for the screen states that over timethe check will: (i) assess all 85 GPCs that children are expected to be taught; and that (ii) inclusionof a particular grapheme will not necessarily bein proportion to its frequency in words suitablefor Year 1 pupils. Research will be reported toestablish whether or not the stated aims wereachieved.The research analysed all 460 GPCs assessed inthe PSC between 2012-2014 In contrast to thestated aims: (i) the letter ‘t’ has appeared on 37occasions whereas the letter ‘x’ has appearedonce; (ii) just 15 GPCs account for over 67% ofthe GPCs assessed and (iii) 27 GPCs (31.76%)have never been assessed. Furthermore,where a grapheme represents more than onephoneme, only the most frequently occurringrepresentation has been assessed. It thereforeappears that the occurrence of GPCs in thephonic screening check reflects their occurrencein naturally occurring written English.The implications of these outcomes will bediscussed in relation to rational analytic theory.It will be suggested that the stated content ofthe PSC encourages the teaching of GPCs whichoccur infrequently in written English and areof low utility. It will be argued that (i) literacydifficulties could be prevented through teachinga small number of high utility GPCs; (ii) the PSCis in fact an assessment of pupils’ vocabularyknowledge and that (iii) ‘teaching to the test’which such high stakes assessments encourage,is a major causes of pupils’ perceived literacydifficulties.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 14:39 - 14:57 GMT
Breakout Room 4

14:57 GMT

Effects of an Early Phonological Training Study: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis
Limited Capacity full
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Effects of an early phonological training study: alatent growth curve analysisUlrika WolffUniversity of Gothenburgulrika.wolff@ped.gu.seCo-author: Jan-Eric GustafssonSeveral studies have shown that training ofphonological awareness prior to, or in thebeginning of, reading instruction has positiveeffects on early reading acquisition. However,there always seems to be a hard core oftreatment resisters. In Sweden most childrenreceive phonological training when they are sixyears old, and school starts at the age of seven.In this study a phonological awareness trainingprogram was implemented in 45 preschoolsto children aged four. The purpose was toinvestigate the effect of a phonological trainingthree years before formal reading instructionstarts. Children were randomly assigned insmall groups to a phonological training group(n = 117), or a non-phonological training group(n = 105). A non-trained control group was alsoincluded (n = 142).The phonological training was carried out in twowaves during six weeks at the age 4 and 5. A testbattery comprising tests capturing phonologicalability was individually administered at the preandpost-tests, and at the follow-up test at age6. The effect of the training was investigatedby a two-group latent growth curve analysis.The influence of fluid intelligence (Gf) was alsoexamined.Preliminary analyses show that there wasa significant effect of the phonologicalintervention on children’s phonologicalawareness skills after each wave of training.There was also an interaction effect of Gf andintervention in favour of the children in theexperimental group with low Gf. Between thetraining periods the gap was narrowing betweenthe groups. Yet, there was a remaining effect oneyear after the last wave of training, especiallyfor the children in the 20th percentile. Earlyphonological training, thus, seems to be mostbeneficial for children with poor phonologicalskills.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 14:57 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 4

14:57 GMT

Introducing Dyslexia Friendly Practices in Greek Primary EFL Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

Introducing dyslexia - friendly practices inGreek primary EFL classroomsMaria RerakiUniversity of Birminghamm.reraki@bham.ac.ukThe number of intervention studies that focus onthe inclusion of learners with dyslexia in foreignlanguage contexts is limited. In this study,dyslexia-friendly practices (BDA, 2005) wereintroduced Greek primary EFL classrooms toexplore whether they can enhance dyslexic EFLlearners’ inclusion and promote circulation ofinclusive practice. The way the dyslexia-friendlypractices were experienced by non-dyslexic EFLlearners and EFL teachers was also addressedto enlighten the impact of the dyslexia-friendlypractices in mainstream EFL contexts The dyslexia-friendly practices were introducedin three Greek EFL classrooms constituted by anaverage of fifteen EFL learners each. The effectsof the dyslexia-friendly practices on dyslexicand non-dyslexic EFL learners’ performance andmotivation were explored. EFL teachers’ viewsof employing the dyslexia-friendly practiceswere also examined. In this multiple case study,classroom observations, teacher and pupilinterviews, focus groups and a personal researchdiary were the methods of data collectionemployed. Data were analysed using thematicanalysis and a critical realism framework.Comparisons before and during the introductionof the dyslexia-friendly practices showed thatthe dyslexia-friendly practices improved dyslexicand non-dyslexic EFL learners’ motivation andperformance. Further, dyslexic EFL learners’inclusion was enhanced. The dyslexia-friendlypractices were experienced positively by allthree EFL teachers. The study’s findings indicatethe need for circulation of inclusive practicefor dyslexic learners. Further, this researchemphasizes the importance of making languagelearning accessible to dyslexic pupils by creatingdyslexia-friendly environments.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 14:57 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 3

15:15 GMT

Coffee Break and posters
Friday March 11, 2016 15:15 - 15:45 GMT
Venue

15:45 GMT

Issues in Diagnosing Dyslexia
Abstract: Since the first descriptions of children with congenital word blindness or dyslexia theproper criteria for a diagnosis of dyslexia have been debated. Issues in this debate concern theuse of a discrepancy between reading ability and intelligence, the role of underlying causes ofreading and spelling, the need to distinguish subtypes of dyslexia and, more recently, the typeof reading measure (silent or oral) to be used as a basis for the diagnosis. This talk will considerrecent evidence from family risk studies of dyslexia and from research into the process ofreading that speaks to these issues.

Chair
Keynote
PP

Professor Peter de Jong

Biography: Peter de Jong studies the development of basic skills such as reading, writing andarithmetic, as well as the attendant educational problems. His interests cover a wide rangeof related issues, from aetiology and diagnostics to the prevention and treatment of learningdisorders... Read More →


Friday March 11, 2016 15:45 - 16:30 GMT
Auditorium

16:30 GMT

Reading about Reading: Reflections on the Current State of the Literature
Abstract: The comprehension of written material requires the seamless orchestration of acomplex set of skills by the reader that vary as a function of text and purpose. Studies examiningthe interrelationship between reader and text have the potential to further our understandingof the processes underlying reading comprehension and inform practices that promote readingcomprehension skills in poor readers. However, for those interested in exploring the relationshipbetween reader and text it has been necessary to run separate models aggregating to thelevel of text (losing the ability to examine reader level variance) or aggregating to the level ofthe reader (losing the ability to examine text level variance), thereby eliminating the ability toexamine important reader, text, and reader by text interactions in the same model.In this presentation we use item response random-effects modeling that allows us to explainvariability in reading comprehension by simultaneously partitioning variance across reader,passage, and question characteristics. We explore the importance of various cognitivecharacteristics and question features plus passage mode of access for comprehendinggrade-level passages (i.e., listening vs. reading). All effects were adjusted for passagespecifictopic familiarity due to the documented relation between background knowledgeand comprehension. Participants were 254 fifth-grade students with a range of readingabilities, although children with poor reading skills were overrepresented. Results emphasizethe importance of various forms of knowledge (passage specific, general background, andvocabulary) in facilitating reading comprehension.

Chair
Keynote
PE

Professor Elena Grigorenko

Biography: Elena Grigorenko’s primary interest is in understanding the co-contribution of geneticand environmental risk factors to the manifestation of developmental and learning disabilities inchildren. She is especially interested in how children with special needs, such as those... Read More →


Friday March 11, 2016 16:30 - 17:15 GMT
Auditorium

17:15 GMT

Adults and Dyslexia/SpLD, a Review of the Current Research and Social Landscape and the Campaigns being Undertaken by the BDA and DAN
Adults and Dyslexia/SpLD, a review of thecurrent research / social landscape and thecampaigns being undertaken by BDA and DANMargaret MalpasBritish Dyslexia Association, Dyslexia AdultNetwork margaretmalpas@gmail.com The current situation for adults; a summary ofrelevant research; the campaigns I am leadingvia BDA and the Dyslexia Adult Network onawareness of dyslexia and the issues beyondliteracy. The session is mainly to provideinformation but questions will be welcomedand discussion points given at the end. This isthe situation for adults; here is what we aredoing to campaign for better understanding ofthe key issues for adults and need the audienceto join us in this; we need research beyondliteracy acquisition into the key areas of personalorganisation and to inform improved supportmechanisms in the UK.

Speakers

Friday March 11, 2016 17:15 - 18:00 GMT
Auditorium

18:00 GMT

Networking and Exhibitors
Friday March 11, 2016 18:00 - 18:30 GMT
Venue
 
Saturday, March 12
 

08:30 GMT

Registration and Coffee
Saturday March 12, 2016 08:30 - 09:30 GMT
Venue

09:30 GMT

Development of Literacy in Children at High-Risk of Dyslexia: Implications for Intervention
Abstract: This talk will present findings from longitudinal studies of children at high-risk ofdyslexia highlighting the role of early language delay in the etiology of dyslexia. Data from alongitudinal study of children followed from age 3 to 8 years will focus first on their preschoollanguage profiles and then on outcomes. It will be argued that dyslexia is the outcome ofmultiple risk factors and that children who enter school with a language impairment are mostat risk of reading problems. We will consider the implications of these findings for education,particularly for intervention to promote reading and language.

Chair
Keynote
PM

Professor Maggie Snowling

Biography: Margaret (Maggie) Snowling is President of St. John’s College and Professor in theDepartment of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford. Prior to moving to Oxford in2012, she was Professor of Psychology at the University of York where she was Co-Director ofthe Centre... Read More →


Saturday March 12, 2016 09:30 - 10:15 GMT
Auditorium

10:15 GMT

Coffee Break and posters
Saturday March 12, 2016 10:15 - 10:30 GMT
Venue

10:30 GMT

Assessment of Reading Acquisition in Urdu Language; Towards Testing and Profiling
Limited Capacity seats available

Assessment of reading acquisition in Urdulanguage; towards testing and profilingSana-e-Zehra HaidryCenter for Language and Cognition Groningen(CLCG), University of Groningen, Groningen, TheNetherlandsUniversity of Groningen (NL), Newcastle(UK), Potsdam (GE), Trento (IT) & MacquarieUniversity (AU)sanahaidry@yahoo.comCo-authors: Ben Maassen (Center for Languageand Cognition Groningen (CLCG), Universityof Groningen, Groningen, The NetherlandsDepartment of Neuroscience, University MedicalCenter Groningen, University of Groningen,The Netherlands), Anne Castles ( ARC Centre ofExcellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD)Department of Cognitive Science, MacquarieUniversity, Sydney, Australia)Aim of this study was to design a diagnosticreading test in Urdu language (spoken inKarachi, Pakistan), and to assess the natureand profile of Urdu reading acquisition. Crosslinguisticstudies have revealed variability inthe role of basic language skills and capacities,such as phonological awareness and rapidautomatized naming, in determining readingacquisition progress, in relation to orthographictransparency and morphological complexityof the target language. Specific challenges(diacritics, letter position) make Urduorthography an interesting case to study readingmodels.More than 240 children, aged 7 – 11 years,were recruited from three middle-to-highincome private schools in Karachi. Based onteacher information, poor readers were overrepresented.A test-battery was constructedand administered, comprising tests of letterknowledge (active and passive), single wordreading, pseudoword reading, vocabulary,spelling to dictation, phonological awareness,and rapid naming (colours, pictures, digits).In addition, subtests to compare readingwords with (transparent) and without (opaque) diacritics were added, and teacherquestionnaireswere administered. Datacollection has just been completed. Usingteacher judgments and questionnaire dataas criterion to select average readers. First,reference-values of all subtests are determined.Second, typical profiles of reading words ascompared to pseudowords, reading as comparedto spelling, and the relations with underlyingphonological and other neuro-linguisticmeasures are analysed. Interpretation of theseprofiles will focus on reading processes inrelation to transparency of the orthography andcomplexity of the word-forms, as well as neurolinguisticskills underlying reading acquisition.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 10:30 - 10:48 GMT
Breakout Room 3

10:30 GMT

Morphological Awareness & Spelling Development in EFL: The Case of Arabic L1 Students
Limited Capacity seats available

Morphological Awareness & SpellingDevelopment in EFL: The Case of Arabic L1StudentsArige EloutyBar Ilan Universityaelouti@gmail.comCo-author: Elinor Saiegh-HaddadThe primary aim of this study and its uniquefeature is investigating the developmentalpatterns of the inflectional and the derivationalmorphological systems separately in normalversus poor spellers. The study hypothesizedthat the derivational system would betterdifferentiate between the NS & PS groups asit is more challenging and more dependent onlexical knowledge than the inflectional affixsystem. Further it predicted that there wouldbe a connection between IMA and DMA, andinflectional and derivational morpheme-spelling.360 EFL students, 5th, 7th and 9th grade ArabicL1; students were subjected to screening tasksrealhigh frequency word reading and spelling inEnglish.A total of 131 NS & PS were selected. Researchtasks used were: i) IMA and DMA measuresusing Analogy (production) task; consisting oftwo subtests that differed in the lexical statusof items: real-words and pseudowords. ii) Aspelling task in the form of dictation (production)that targeted inflected and derived words. MAdevelopment emerged across grades in bothgroups, steeper among NS. Group differencesappeared in MA task, in both systems in allgrades. Difference between the two affixsystems, emerged only in the 5th (NS, PS) and7th (PS) grades. Relationship between MAand spelling, varied across grades and groups.IMA and suffix-spelling correlated in the 5thgrade (NS & PS) and in the 7th PS group.Developmental progression in spelling wasfound in both systems varying across grades andgroups.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 10:30 - 10:48 GMT
Breakout Room 4

10:30 GMT

Supporting the Transition to Inclusivity in Higher Education using Multisensory Teaching
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Supporting the Transition to Inclusivity inHigher Education using Multisensory TeachingAnne McLoughlin, Kate DaviesEdge Hill UniversityAnne.McLoughlin@edgehill.ac.ukDaviesak@edgehill.ac.ukThis workshop will explore multisensoryteaching in Higher Education to support studentswith dyslexia. The principles that teaching forlearners with dyslexia needs to be structured,cumulative and multisensory have beenimplemented on university courses. Practicalstrategies will be demonstrated and evidenceof their contribution to inclusion of studentswith dyslexia will be presented. This practicalworkshop is suitable for all teachers and supportstaff working in higher and further education.David Willets (2014) announcement thatuniversities need to make reasonableadjustments at institutional and individual levelas well as proposed changes to DSA (disabledstudents allowance) will provide a challenge foruniversities in meeting the legal requirementsof the Equality Act in the future. This workshopwill support with the transition to inclusivity byempowering teachers to make changes in thedesign and delivery of their courses.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 10:30 - 11:15 GMT
Breakout Room 5

10:30 GMT

Workplace Difficulties, Tribunals & Court Hearings: Meeting the Challenges and Exploring Solutions
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Workplace difficulties, tribunals & courthearings: meeting the challenges and exploringsolutions.Melanie JamesonDyslexia Adult Network / Dyslexia ConsultancyMalvernmj@dyslexia-malvern.co.ukHow can workplace difficulties be resolved?What support / guidance is available if mattersescalate to a tribunal? How can people withSLDs be supported during court processes? Ihave provided signposts in this difficult territorythrough training of justice staff, SLD input injudicial guidance and resources to share with theSLD community. Melanie will present the mainissues, outline recent changes in the system, andshare free resources and signpost to sources ofhelp. Case Studies will illustrate good and badoutcomes, to enable participants to considerhow best to engage with these challengingsituations.Although individual situations cannot be dealtwith, discussion around issues of interest isencouraged. Good practice will be shared. Pleasenote: SEN tribunals will not be covered. Copingin courts & tribunals is especially daunting forthose with SLDs. But advice is available andsources of support can still be located. Disabilityprovisions can be customised for people withSLDs. Be clear about your needs and how thesemight be accommodated. Address difficultiesat work at the earliest stage; this may involveAccess to Work and ‘reasonable adjustments’.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 10:30 - 11:15 GMT
Breakout Room 6

10:30 GMT

Developing Specialist Dyslexia Training across the Globe: how can we ensure excellence?
Developing specialist dyslexia training acrossthe globe: how can we ensure excellence?Mike Johnson and Tilly MortimoreBDA Accreditation Board t.mortimore@bathspa.ac.ukThere is a pressing need for quality specialistSpLD/dyslexia training for assessors and teachersto support dyslexic learners internationally.However, there are few courses offeringaffordable, reliable internationally recognisedSpLD/dyslexia qualifications that also respectthe cultural and language needs of the countryconcerned. This symposium explores thechallenges of developing courses; presentssuggestions for support and solutions; sharesthe experiences of successful course leadersacross international contexts and highlightssome ways in which remote training mighthelp to reduce the problems encountered. Thesession will provide opportunities for the sharingof constructive practice to enhance coursedevelopment and delivery.Papers will cover:• Overcoming the challenges of establishingBDA accredited international courses: BDAAccreditation Board (Mike Johnson, TillyMortimore)• Lessons from the Bellavista DyslexiaAttendance Course, Johannesburg, SouthAfrica: Kalie Naidoo, Course Leader,• Introducing SpLD Policy and Teacher Trainingin Europe. (Colin Lannen, Dr. Sionah Lannenand Dr. Gavin Reid)• The use of on line training for developingBDA accredited international expertise(Margaret Malpas, BDA)

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 10:30 - 12:00 GMT
Auditorium

10:30 GMT

Neurobiological Correlates of Reading Related Processes and Fact Retrieval in Developmental Dyslexia
Limited Capacity seats available

Neurobiological correlates of reading relatedprocesses and fact retrieval in developmentaldyslexiaKristina MollLudwig-Maximilians University MunichGermanyKristina.Moll@med.uni-muenchen.deThe symposium focuses on the neurobiologicalcorrelates associated with symptoms of dyslexia,namely deficits in letter-sound processing, inliteracy skills and in fact retrieval. The aim of thesymposium is to specify the time course and thestructural and functional correlates underlyingthese problems in individuals with dyslexiacompared to normal readers. The findingscan improve our understanding of the causesunderlying literacy and arithmetic deficits inindividuals with developmental dyslexia.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 10:30 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 2

10:30 GMT

Psychological Perspectives on the Assessment of Dyslexia: Pitfalls & Advances
Limited Capacity seats available

Psychological Perspectives on the Assessmentof Dyslexia: Pitfalls & AdvancesRainer KurzOutstanding Achievementsichinendaimoku@gmail.comThis symposium is focussed on Dyslexiaassessment of adults. The first papersummarises the literature on treatmentinterventions for dyslexic adults in employmentand presents a promising empirical study. Thesecond paper draws on the eclectic training andextensive experience of the author in providingmulti-sensory therapy away from the work orstudy place. The third paper applies tailoredability testing to get an in-depth understandingof cognitive functioning. The final paper exploresthe role of ability and personality assessments indiagnosing ‘Twice Exceptional’ individuals.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 10:30 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 1

10:48 GMT

Contribution of Cognitive Abilities and Home Literacy Environment to Reading Fluency in Japanese
Limited Capacity seats available

Contribution of cognitive abilities and homeliteracy environment to reading fluency inJapaneseTomoe InomataUniversity of Tsukubainomata@kansei.tsukuba.ac.jpCo-authors: Akira Uno (University of Tsukuba),Atsushi Sakai (Tokyo Metropolitan University),Noriko Haruhara (Mejiro University)The home literacy environment has beenreported to contribute to children’s earlyliteracy skills. However, little is known about theeffect of home literacy on later school readingachievement. In a three-year longitudinal study,we investigated cognitive and environmentalpredictors of reading fluency in Grade 2, anddevelopment of reading fluency from Grade 1through Grade 2. Participants comprised 121children from two kindergartens. Phonologicalawareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN),visual cognition, receptive vocabulary, andHiragana character reading were assessedduring the middle of kindergarten. Parentsfilled a questionnaire on their home literacyenvironment: the frequency of book reading andparent teaching.Later, in Grade 1, the children’s cognitive abilitiesand home environments were re-assessed. Thereading fluency of Hiragana words, nonwords,and paragraphs were measured in Grades 1 and2. The children’s intelligence was also tested inGrade 2.Scores in RAN, phonological awareness, andfrequency of book reading were significantpredictors for all reading fluency tasks in Grade2. However, when previous Grade 1 readingfluency was taken into account, the contributionof cognitive and environmental variablesbecame insignificant in word and non-wordreading fluency tasks, whereas book readingfrequency remained a significant predictor ofparagraph reading fluency in Grade 2. Thesefindings suggest that in addition to phonologicalawareness and naming speed, book readingmay also contribute to development of readingfluency.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 10:48 - 11:06 GMT
Breakout Room 3

10:48 GMT

The Effect of Diglossia on Word Reading in Arabic: A Comparison between Dyslexic and Typically Developing Readers
Limited Capacity seats available

The Effect of Diglossia on Word Reading inArabic: A Developmental StudyElinor Saiegh-HaddadBar-Ilan University, IsraelElinor.Saiegh-Haddad@biu.ac.ilCo-author: Rachel Schiff (Bar-Ilan University,Israel)The linguistic distance between Standard Arabic(StA) and Spoken Arabic (SpA) is a prominentfeature of Arabic diglossia. Yet, its direct effecton word reading has never been tested. Thecurrent study tested the development of wordreading ability (voweled and unvoweled) inStA and in SpA, separately. We also testedthe extent to which reading efficiency in StAmay be predicted by the students’ readingability (accuracy and fluency) in SpA. Wordreading accuracy and fluency (C/W per minute)in the two varieties and in the vowelled andunvowelled orthography were tested among100 students in the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, and 10th  grades (N=20 per grade). The results showeda clear effect of diglossia on reading in bothvowelled and unvowelled Arabic with scores inSpA higher than those in StA across all grades,and with the gap between the two languagevarieties closing at higher grades only and in SpAearlier than in StA. We also found that readingin SpA strongly predicted reading StA in bothvowelled and unvoweled Arabic. The resultsprovide direct evidence of the effect of diglossiaon word reading development in Arabic.


Saturday March 12, 2016 10:48 - 11:06 GMT
Breakout Room 4

11:06 GMT

Dyslexia in Ireland: Challenges and Transitions
Limited Capacity seats available

Dyslexia in Ireland: Challenges and TransitionsTherese McPhillipsSt Patricks College Dublin City Universitytherese.mcphillips@spd.dcu.ieCo-authors: Donna Hazzard (St Mary’s College,Belfast), AnnMarie Casserly (St Angela’s CollegeSligo), Gillian Beck (Stranmillis College, Belfast),Bairbre Tiernan (St Angela’s College Sligo),Donna HazzardThe purpose of the research study (2013-15) wasto clarify present policy in the area of dyslexiasupport, North and South and to identifystrategic policy which informs good practice.The aim of the research project was to consultwith original members of the Dyslexia Task Forcegroups, North and South (DENI,DES, 2002) andascertain their views and perspectives on theprovision of support for pupils with dyslexia,twelve years on. In addition, the project aimedto consult with key stakeholders in the area ofdyslexia. Participants were drawn from threegroups: 1. original TFD and TGD members(DES, DENI, 2001-2); 2. Personnel from Stateand college Education departments in bothjurisdictions, e.g. DES and DENI Inspectorates,the RoI NEPS, the NI ELBs, and Special EducationSupport Services North and South. 3. Personnelinvolved in teaching and learning for pupilswith dyslexia at schools level: parents, teachers,support staff. Mainstream and specialistprovision were addressed.In total 23 semi structured interviews wereconducted-13 from RoI and 10 from NI. InNI there was a feeling that the Report wasa catalyst for more specific change at threelevels- inclusion, partnership and policy.RoI interviewees considered that the TFDdescription of dyslexia (DES, 2002, p.31) hasmade an impact. Some noted the reference toIQ and a discrepancy model of identification ascounterproductive in terms of defining dyslexiaalong a continuum. Criticism was expressedaround the introduction of the GeneralAllocation Model of support (DES, 2005),perception that there has been a reduction inindividual support for students with dyslexia.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 11:06 - 11:24 GMT
Breakout Room 4

11:06 GMT

Relative Importance of Language and Cognitive Skills to Reading Comprehension
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Relative importance of language and cognitiveskills to reading comprehensionYoung-Suk KimFlorida State Universityykim@fcrr.orgCo-author: Yaacov Petscher (Florida Center forReading Research)Previous studies have shown that readingcomprehension draws on multiple languageand cognitive skills. In the present study, weinvestigated how various language and cognitiveskills are related to reading comprehension, andwhether strengths of those relations varied as afunction of children’s reading proficiency level.This question was addressed using data fromfirst grade children learning to read in an opaqueorthography (English) and first grade childrenlearning to read in a relatively transparentorthography (Korean).A total of 201 Korean-speaking children inSouth Korea and 179 English-speaking childrenin North America participated in the study.These first graders were assessed on readingcomprehension, word reading, vocabulary,syntactic knowledge, inference making,and comprehension monitoring. Childrenwere individually assessed in quiet areasby trained research assistants in respectivecountries. Data were analysed using quantiledominance analysis, which allows for examiningrelative importance of included variables atdifferent quintile proficiency levels of readingcomprehension. Results showed that for childrenwith high proficiency of reading comprehension,

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 11:06 - 11:24 GMT
Breakout Room 3

11:15 GMT

Maths Word Problems: Helping Students with SpLD in Singapore
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Maths Word Problems: SingaporeexperienceTim BunnDyslexia Association of Singaporetimbunn@das.org.sgCo-author: Anaberta Oehlers-JaenThe workshop presents an outline of mathslearning difficulties in word problems, ademonstration of bar-modelling techniques,and an opportunity to discuss their value. Theremay be no unique “magic bullet” for teachingchildren with maths learning difficulties to domaths word problems, but the bar-modellingtechniques used in Singapore maths can makea significant contribution to learning for manychildren, because it makes problems clearerusing visual methods. It is a kind of “visualalgebra” without the letters.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 11:15 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 6

11:15 GMT

What does VIsuo/Spatial Ability mean and how can it be Identified?
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What does Visuo/Spatial Ability mean and howcan it be Identified?Beverley SteffertOpen UniversityDrSteffert@learningrecovery.co.ukTony Steffert (Open University)Ways of Assessing and training Visuo/spatialability based on comparisons between 398dyslexics and non-Dyslexics on norms of theWISCv. Being able to assess this strength beforethe Dyslexics reading disabilities lower theirself-esteem would be an advantage to theteacher who may also want to improve spatialability in the whole class with 3-D training.The problem-solving advantage of good visuo/spatial ability is evident in Maths, Physics, D&T,ICT, 87 Art and perception of non-verbal bodylanguage and prosody since these are more right72 hemisphere mediated skills. This workshop will demonstrate means of training visuo/spatialability from physical activities such as jugglingand rubric cube type puzzles to computer based3-D training.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 11:15 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 5

11:24 GMT

Specialised Visual Processing for Print: An ERP Study Comparing Alphabetic and Character Scripts
Limited Capacity seats available

Specialized visual processing for print: An ERPstudy comparing alphabetic and characterscriptsBen MaassenUniversity of Groningen, Netherlandsb.a.m.maassen@rug.nlCo-author: Rui QinFluent adult readers activate specialized visualbrain processes when presented with wordsor word-like letter strings. A recent series ofstudies demonstrated that the N170 componentof the event-related potentials (ERPs) over the(left-lateralized) visual word-form area (VWFA)is a robust neurophysiological marker reflectingthe visual decoding of print stimuli. Aim ofthis study is to further explore the preciseprocess underlying this so called print tuningeffect: is it triggered by grapheme-to-phonemeconversion, or does it reflect visual familiaritywith orthographic word forms.To shed light on this issue, the N170 componentof the ERP-response was measured in nativeChinese readers (N = 19) presented with (1)logographic Chinese, (2) Pinyin, a phoneticsystem for transcribing Chinese characters intothe Latin alphabet, and (3) meaningless symbolstrings. To control for confounds of low-levelstimulus features, the same measurements wereconducted in native Dutch adult readers (N =19) who were completely ignorant of writtenChinese. Both groups responded more stronglyto characters than to symbol strings, but thecharacter-symbol N170 amplitude differencewas significantly left-lateralized in the Chinesegroup only; the Dutch group demonstrated abilateral topography instead. On the other hand,neither group showed a lateralized tuning effectfor Pinyin. Our findings suggest that the leftlateralizedN170 tuning can specifically reflectvisual processing of familiar orthographic wordforms with little or no involvement of phonology.Further comparisons with processing alphabeticscripts will be discussed.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 11:24 - 11:42 GMT
Breakout Room 3

11:24 GMT

The Danish Dyslexia Test. Validity of a Wide-Range, Web-Based Test for Dyslexia
Limited Capacity filling up

The Danish Dyslexia Test. Validity of a widerange,web-based test for dyslexiaMads PoulsenUniversity of Copenhagenm.poulsen@hum.ku.dkCo-authors: Carsten Elbro, Helene Lykke Møller,Holger Juul, Dorthe Klint Petersen, ElisabethArnbakDyslexia is a long lasting problem in learning todecode written words accurately and fluently.This definition suggests that dyslexia remainssufficiently constant to be assessed reliably withjust one wide-range test across all educationallevels. The current study investigated thispossibility by asking whether students whoreceive special support in reading differ fromother students on the same scale of decodingacross all educational levels. Decoding andspelling measures from a newly developed,web-based Danish dyslexia test were taken from1564 students from Grade 3 to university inDenmark. Oversampling of 300 students whoreceived special support in reading allowed forcomparisons with current practice for referral tospecial support.Decoding skills increased from Grade 3 to 9.There was limited evidence for further agebasedgrowth beyond Grade 9. Measures ofdecoding difficulties were reliably associatedwith current practices for referral to specialsupport at all educational levels. On average,students receiving special support performedat the 5th percentile of the unselected groups.The results suggest that a wide-range test ofdecoding can be a valid marker of dyslexia acrosseducational levels. A unified test may simplifytesting and facilitate a common understandingof dyslexia throughout the educational system

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 11:24 - 11:42 GMT
Breakout Room 4

11:42 GMT

Exploring the Inflectional Morphology in Greek Reading Disabled Children
Limited Capacity seats available

Exploring the inflectional morphology in Greekreading disabled childrenKyriakoula RothouUniversity of Thessaloniki, Greecekyriakirothou@gmail.comTo explore the inflectional morphologicalawareness of children with reading disabilitiesin an orthographically transparent language:Greek language. There is a limited researchin languages with shallow orthography andso our study will add in the field of readingdevelopment and reading disabilities.Participants consisted of 15 children withreading disability (RD) in the third grade and27 age-matched children with normal readingskills (NR).RD children scored below the 30thpercentile in decoding and above the 40thpercentile in reading comprehension. Thenoun–adjective inflection task assessed theability of children to produce the plural ofarticles, adjectives, and nouns in the context of asentence.The verb inflection task used asked children tochange the tense of the verb in a sentence. Bothtasks were orally presented. Non-parametrictechniques were used for analysis. There weresignificant differences between the two readinggroups on two inflectional morphology tasks(Mann-Whitney tests, p<.001). Both tasks weredifficult for the children with reading difficulties,and especially the verb inflections (Wilcoxontest, p<.001). Interestingly, the normallydeveloping readers differed in their performanceon two tasks (Wilcoxon test, p<.001). It issuggested that Greek speaking third gradechildren with reading disabilities have poorinflectional morphological awareness skills,while age-matched readers have developedthese skills.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 11:42 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 4

11:42 GMT

Relations Between Cognitive-linguistic Skills and Chinese Writing Among Children with Dyslexia
Limited Capacity seats available

Relations between Cognitive-linguistic Skillsand Chinese Writing among Children withDyslexiaPui-sze YeungThe University of Hong Kongpatcyy@hku.hkCo-author: Connie Suk-han Ho (The University ofHong Kong), David Wai-ock Chan (The ChineseUniversity of Hong Kong), Kevin Kien-hoa Chung(The Hong Kong Institute of Education)Recent studies on the relations betweencognitive-linguistic skills and Chinese writinghave shown that transcription skills, syntacticskills and working memory are significantlongitudinal predictors of Chinese writtencomposition performance among children inelementary grades. Yet, there have been fewstudies investigating the relations betweencognitive-linguistic skills and writing amongChinese children with reading difficulties. Onemajor purpose of the study was to identify thechallenges encountered by Chinese children with reading difficulties in learning to writecomposition. Participants in the study were56 children in Grades 1-5 in Hong Kong. 28 ofthese children were reported to have dyslexia(dyslexic group) (16 boys and 12 girls) and 28 ofthese children were without reading difficulties(control group) (17 boys and 11 girls).Children in the two groups were matched ingrade, age and non-verbal reasoning ability.All participants were administered tasks oncomponent skills of transcription (word spelling,and handwriting fluency), oral language(vocabulary depth and syntactic skills), workingmemory and Chinese written composition.Preliminary ANCOVA results showed that thedyslexic group performed significantly lesswell than the control group in all tasks, exceptthe working memory task. Initial hierarchicalregression results showed that transcriptionskills, the most robust predictors of writing inprevious studies, were not significant predictorsof writing among children with dyslexia. Instead,working memory was the most significantpredictor of written composition. These findingshelp inform the development of interventionprogram for Chinese children with dyslexia inlearning to write.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 11:42 - 12:00 GMT
Breakout Room 3

12:00 GMT

Lunch and posters
Saturday March 12, 2016 12:00 - 13:00 GMT
Venue

13:00 GMT

Phonology and Dyslexia: A Sensory/Neural Perspective
Abstract: Research with dyslexic children suggests that sensitivity to metrical (rhythmic)structure is key to developing good phonological skills. Children with dyslexia are insensitiveto metrical rhythm and individual differences in beat-related tasks are strong predictors ofphonological development. Sensitivity to rhythmic (metrical) structure is related to basicauditory processing of the amplitude modulation structure of speech, and neural encodingof the amplitude modulation structure is enabled by rhythmic oscillatory entrainment. Usingrecent insights from auditory neuroscience, I will provide an overview of key factors in thedevelopment of language and phonology. I aim to show how an oscillatory “temporal sampling”neural framework for linking auditory processing to phonological development may be useful inexplaining the phonological deficit that characterises developmental dyslexia.

Chair
Keynote
PU

Professor Usha Goswami

Biography: Prior to moving to Cambridge in January 2003, Usha Goswami was Professor ofCognitive Developmental Psychology at the Institute of Child Health, University College London.She received her Ph.D. from the University of Oxford in 1987, her topic was reading and spellingby analogy... Read More →


Saturday March 12, 2016 13:00 - 13:45 GMT
Auditorium

13:45 GMT

Phonological Skills in Multilingual Adolescents in South Africa
Limited Capacity seats available

Phonological skills in multilingual adolescents in South AfricaIan SmytheDo-IT Solutions Ltdianssmythe@gmail.comCo-author: John Everatt, University of Canterbury, New ZealandEvidence suggests that pupils entering vocational colleges in South Africa do not have the literacy skill levels to fulfil the course requirements. Whilst it would be easy to blame the primary and secondary education system, the problems faced in South Africa are complex due to many factors including teacher qualifications, diversity of socio-economics, 11 national languages, and a lack of a cohesive local (school based) and national assessment protocol. Furthermore, there is little research investigating skills and abilities that support literacy across different language groups of students.A battery of tests was developed for use in an online data collection system. Measures were based on widely accepted test protocols traditionally used in paper format, but were developed to be appropriate for the cultural context of South Africa. The battery included measures of a diversity of phonological and literacy skills, as well as demographic information. Data were collected on 4500 primary and secondary aged children from a range of language backgrounds. All measures were in English to assess levels of performance across the language background groups.Initial data analyses of over 4500 indicate statistically significant differences in measures of literacy (e.g. non-word spelling) and phonological processing (e.g. sound discrimination tasks) across the different language background groups. Weaknesses in phonological areas appear to have a knock on effect on the development of literacy skills, vary between language groups. Further analyses considered the impact of these backgrounds and the implications of these effects in terms of cross-language interactions and support practices will be discussed.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 13:45 - 14:03 GMT
Breakout Room 4

13:45 GMT

Talking the Line: Dyslexic and Dyspraxic Arts Graduates Articulate their Perceptions of Objects in Space through the Vehicle of Drawing
Limited Capacity seats available

Drawing Workshop: Talking the LineQona RankinCo-authors: Howard Riley, Nicola Brunswick,Chris McManus, Rebecca ChamberlainRoyal College of Art; Middlesex University;University College London; Laboratory ofExperimental Psychology, KU Leuven, Belgiumqona.rankin@rca.ac.uk, howard.riley@btinternet.com, chamberlainrebeccas@gmail.com, n.brunswick@mdx.ac.uk, i.mcmanus@ucl.ac.ukStarting from the premise that the dyslexic’scognitive differences, as described by Frith(1997), Snowling (1997), Kirby (1999),Mortimore (2003) and Gilroy and Miles (1996),impact on how, and the speed with which peoplereceive, hold retrieve and structure information.We are interested to discover whether thesecognitive differences could also affect perceivingand translating a three dimensional object inspace into a two dimensional drawing. As wellas wishing to understand why some art studentscannot draw well, we would also like to beable to help art students who recognise certainshortcomings in their drawing, and who wishto improve their observational drawing skills.Recently on radio 4, Chris McManus describeddrawing from observation as: “taking in visualinput, processing it through our eye, through ourbrain, sending it to another bit of the brain thatproduces motor outputs and moving our handin just the right way to make the two look thesame, it’s a very complicated process.”Our previous research raises several possibilities.Firstly, it would appear that motivational andpersonality factors are important in being able todraw well, and one possibility is that increasingboth motivation and the opportunity to practicedrawing will improve performance (as withany complex skill). Secondly, It has been welldocumented that explicit teaching can haveenormous benefit on dyslexic and dyspraxicstudents learning (Mortimore 2003) we wishto test the possibility that art students maybenefit from the explicit teaching of techniquesfor carrying out basic skills such as accuratelyrepresenting angles and proportions, judgingfigure/field relationships, and re-conceptualisingtheir processes of perception. An alternativepossibility is that accurately perceiving anglesand proportions would itself be beneficial(Schlegel et al. 2014). In addition it is positedthat the student’s articulation of the drawingprocess whilst drawing could also be of benefit.That by changing the internal dialogue fromwhat is known to what is perceived wouldimpact on how, and the speed with which the 3dimensional visual information is translated into2D.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 13:45 - 14:03 GMT
Breakout Room 2

13:45 GMT

To what Extent is Coaching a ‘Reasonable’ Adjustment for Dyslexia?
Limited Capacity seats available

Is coaching a reasonable adjustment for adultswith dyslexia?Nancy DoyleCity University Londonnancy.doyle@city.ac.ukFrom an employer’s perspective, in orderto define whether a disability adjustment is‘reasonable’, we first need to understand whatit is, if it works, how much it costs and whetherthis cost is off-set by productivity gains andreduced absence/turnover costs. From theemployee’s perspective, we need to inspirefaith in the process, so that the employee candecide if their investment of time and hope isreasonable in proportion to the risk of doingnothing, or relying on technology for supportwith dyslexia.Dyslexia adults have received coaching andtuition support for many years which is welldocumented and discussed in practitioner circles(Moody 2010) but has received little empiricalinvestigation.We see that the majority of dyslexia research isrelated to children, education and neuroscience.Of the 41 papers above, upon investigation onlyfour related to treatment evaluations for adults.Yet from this relatively small literature basethere are strong suggestions that the ‘what’of adult dyslexia is not limited to reading andwriting difficulties (Leather et al. 2011; Gerber2012; de Beer et al. 2014). Doyle & Mcdowall(2015) identified working memory issues asthe most prevalent topics raised in coaching bydyslexic adults and their employers and manywould agree that this is prominent feature(Swanson & Siegel 2001; McLoughlin & Leather2013). Whilst the academic literature raisesmore questions than it answers on definitionand construct (Elliot & Grigorenko 2014) thereis meanwhile a pragmatic need to understandthe existing, ongoing and widespread practice ofdyslexia coaching for adults. Two studies are presented here: does it workand how does it work. The first study is a quasiexperimental,blind controlled evaluation ofstrategy coaching in a sample of 40 adults (aged23-56) all working in a county council in a rangeof professional and semi-professional careers.They were placed randomly into one of threegroups: one-2-one coaching, group coachingand control. The groups were tested at threeintervals: before the intervention; immediatelyafter; three months after. The second study is asystematic review of the literature investigatingthe mechanisms by which coaching mayimpact upon work performance. The practicalimplications for coaching will be outlined anddirections for future research.This research is set in a political climate in whichcuts to services are commonplace and supportis frequently restricted to the ‘hardest-tohelp’.Employees are frequently working longerhours to manage reduced head count in manyorganisations, particularly the public sector;they may not to invest time in coaching unlesswe can offer a secure result. It is an ethical andfinancial imperative to ensure that the servicewe recommend as a disability adjustment isreasonably well evaluated, benchmarked andevidence-based.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 13:45 - 14:15 GMT
Breakout Room 3

13:45 GMT

Dyslexia & Music: the Challenges for Dyslexic Musicians & Transition towards Musical Interventions
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Dyslexia & Music; the challenges for dyslexic musicians, & transition towards musical interventionsAnna PittBDA Music Committee & Dyslexia Research Trustanna.pitt@dpag.ox.ac.uk Co-authors: Rosemary Hodi, Paula Bishop-LieblerThe B.D.A.’s Music Committee combine their expertise to inform about relationships between Dyslexia and Music. Research outlines the cognitive & neurological challenges that dyslexic musicians face, & the transition into interventions to support dyslexic musicians and potentially dyslexic learners in general. Including discussion on the standardisation of music exam SpLD accommodations. To convey recent research into the core cognitive challenges of dyslexic musicians and how they relate to literacy learning. Including how teachers can support dyslexic musicians. Also focusing on the difficulties schools and exam boards face when providing special accommodations during examinations and how the BDA music committee are striving to help advise and standardise these accommodations.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 13:45 - 14:30 GMT
Breakout Room 6

13:45 GMT

Safe, Ethical and Useful: Improving Diagnostic Assessments for Adults in the Workplace
Limited Capacity filling up

Assessing adult dyslexics: developing new StandardsSarah CleaverCo-Convenor, British Psychological Society’s (Division of Occupational Psychology) Working Group on Neuro-diversity and Employment; Independent practitioner, Honest Psychology Ltdsarah@honestpsychology.comAssessing adults for dyslexia and related conditions brings its own challenges. For example, if the employer is paying, do they have a right to see the report? What does consent mean, in this context? And what makes a report easy to read? Research undertaken by the BPS’ DOP Working Group found that practice varied widely. We therefore wrote a set of Guidelines, consulted on these widely, and are working on having them accepted as Standards. This session will briefly reveal the underpinning research, before asking delegates to debate key principles from the proposed Standards.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 13:45 - 14:30 GMT
Breakout Room 5

13:45 GMT

Spelling and Handwriting Difficulties in Dyslexia: Studies of Online and Offline Writing Processes
Spelling and Handwriting Difficulties inDyslexia: Studies of online and offline writingprocesses.Marketa CaravolasBangor Universitym.caravolas@bangor.ac.ukSpelling problems are ubiquitous in dyslexia. Wepropose a collection of four talks, two based onEnglish and two on French speakers, on aspectsof spelling among children (3 papers) andadults (one paper) with dyslexia. Our aim is todisseminate new findings about the features andpotential causes of spelling difficulties amongpopulations with dyslexia, while also informingdelegates about current technological advancesin spelling/writing research with tools such asdigitizing tablets for studies of online processes,and automated spelling assessment tools likePONTO (Kessler, 2009). 

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 13:45 - 15:15 GMT
Auditorium

13:45 GMT

The Visual Attention Span Theory of Developmental Dyslexia: the Causality Issue
Limited Capacity seats available

The visual attention span theory ofdevelopmental dyslexia: the causality issue.Sylviane ValdoisCNRS and Université Grenoble AlpesSylviane.Valdois@upmf-grenoble.frIn her Nature Reviews Neuroscience paper,U. Goswami (2014) listed the challenges inestablishing causality for any theory of dyslexia.She argued that the visual attention (VA) spantheory lacked evidence in support of causality.The symposium will discuss the causality issue.Study 1 will focus on the reading level matcheddesign and cross language studies. Study 2 willreport supportive evidence from a longitudinalstudy and Study 3 from a training study. Study4 will present a new computational model thatmakes explicit how VA span reduction affectsletter-string processing.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 13:45 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 1

14:03 GMT

Diagnosing Dyslexia in Deaf Adults. Can a Dynamic Test Provide a Basis?
Limited Capacity seats available

Diagnosing dyslexia in deaf adults. Can adynamic test provide a basis?Holger JuulUniversity of Copenhagenjuul@hum.ku.dkDeaf poor readers are usually not diagnosed asdyslexics because their reading problems may bedue to the sensory loss. Unfortunately, this maycause the problems to be overlooked; and evenwhen recognized, doubts may be raised abouttheir nature and proper treatment becausestandard dyslexia tests of nonword readingrequire proficient spoken language phonology.However, a new dynamic dyslexia test (Elbroet al. 2012) may be applicable and was triedout with a large group of deaf/hard-of-hearingDanish adults (N > 100). The dynamic dyslexiatest (originally devised for second languagelearners) has three parts: 1) Participants learn  three novel letter shapes for three sounds whichare visibly distinct in articulation: /m/, /s/ and/ɑ/. 2) Participants learn to read two-letter nonwordswith the three new letters. 3) Participantsattempt to read 12 longer non-words. Pilottesting indicates that the limited phonologicaldemands make this test applicable with deafadults.In order to assess the general level of literacyskills in the participants, a range of standardreading and writing tests were also taken.Results have yet to be analyzed. Scores on thedynamic test will be compared to scores fromadult dyslexics to reveal whether difficultiesin learning and synthesizing letter-soundcorrespondences are found in deaf adults toa similar extent as in dyslexics. Also, analyseswill reveal whether scores on the dynamic testpredict scores on tests of silent word reading,reading comprehension, spelling and writing.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:03 - 14:21 GMT
Breakout Room 2

14:03 GMT

Factors for Successful Inclusion of Individuals with Dyslexia
Limited Capacity seats available

Occurrence of Dyslexia among Czech PrisonInmatesKaterina KejrovaCharles University, Praguekackejr@gmail.comThe study focused on the occurrence of dyslexiaamong the convicted in the Czech Republic. Onthe ground of plentiful research results fromvarious countries that refer to a connectionbetween dyslexia and criminality, a research wasconducted in Czech penitentiary environment(specifically the Horní Slavkov prison). Theresearch sample comprised of 113 respondentsaged 22 - 65 in the first round of data collection.All respondents met the research criteria: Czechcitizenship, Czech nationality and Czech as amother tongue. The data were collected via theRaven´s standard progressive matrixes, personalquestionnaire, interview, assessment batteryincluding tests on specific learning disabilitiesamong adolescents and adults and a rapidnaming test. The research results have provena several times higher occurrence of dyslexiaamong the sample population than in commonpopulation, which is 34 % dyslexic individuals inthe sample. The research results are comparableto research results from abroad. On top of that,up to 84 % of the respondents spontaneouslydemonstrated dyslexic difficulties during theinterview. Reading and writing skills in thesample are comparable to those in commonpopulation and intelligence is slightly higher thanstandard. The research hypothesis that there isa connection between specific criminal offencesand dyslexia was not proven.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:03 - 14:21 GMT
Breakout Room 3

14:03 GMT

The Imagery-Language Connection: Improving Word Reading & Comprehension in a Multi-Country Analysis
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The Imagery-Language Connection: Improving Word Reading & Comprehension in a Multi-Country AnalysisAngelica BensonLindamood-Bell Learning Processesangelica.benson@lindamoodbell.comThis research paper explores the universality of imagery and its key role in word reading and comprehension by highlighting student pre-post data disaggregated by the United States (US), the United Kingdom, and Australia separately. Learning gains from children ages 10-13 who received one-to-one reading and comprehension intervention between 2008 and 2014 were studied to determine the efficacy of imagery-based instruction addressing students’ learning weaknesses in word reading or comprehension.This study is based on two single-group pre/post designs in three different countries. Gains were measured with several reading and comprehension tests. Group 1 had Seeing Stars® instruction to develop symbol imagery for reading. Group 2 had Visualizing and Verbalizing® instruction to develop concept imagery for comprehension. Students and average hours of instruction by country were: Group 1: US (n=6,667, 111 hours), United Kingdom (n=159, 112 hours), and Australia (n=185, 108 hours). Group 2: US (n=4,448, 106 hours), United Kingdom (n=146, 101 hours), and Australia (n=118, 97 hours).On average, students from the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia achieved comparatively similar improvements in reading and comprehension. They made large standard score changes on nearly all measures and statistically significant progress from pre to post-test on all measures. Imagery-based instruction leads to improved word reading and comprehension in a multi-country analysis. These findings validate the tenets of Dual Coding Theory and suggest the universality of symbol and concept imagery and their important role in language and literacy development. 

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:03 - 14:21 GMT
Breakout Room 4

14:21 GMT

Dyslexia, Reading Difficulties and the Offending Population – a Lesson for us all to Learn!
Limited Capacity filling up

Dyslexia, reading difficulties and the offendingpopulation – a lesson for us all to learn!Amanda KirbyUniversity of South Wales/ Do-IT SolutionsLtd.amanda.kirby@southwales.ac.ukThe prevalence of Dyslexia in the prisonpopulation has been widely quoted as anywherefrom 4-56%. This presentation will demonstratethat distinguishing dyslexia and readingdifficulties is complex. When other factors areconsidered such as early childhood educationalexperiences and presence of co-occurringdevelopmental disorders (such as ADHD) thismay be one reason for the widely varying levels.This paper describes some of the factors thatmay be important to consider and have aneffect on correct identification and could shapeintervention approaches.Data has been collected using a computerised,accessible profiling screening system, TheDo-IT Profiler, in prisons and youth offendinginstitutions in Wales and Scotland (n=3000males) at the time of induction. Backgrounddemographic data includes educationalattendance, support in schools, exclusions rates,diagnoses alongside use of a screening tool forSpecific Learning Difficulties traits includingDyslexia. The results were compared withdata from mainstream populations includingunemployed males (n=3000) and males froma college population (n=2000). The paper willdescribe trends across the prison population (i.e. from youth offending to adult male) and thespecific profile of overlapping patterns acrossSpecific Learning Difficulties.The offender data will show the need toconsider multiple factors to appropriatelyinform intervention and support. It will alsodescribe specific differences relating to executivefunctioning in the offender males comparedto those unemployed, and from the collegepopulation. The implications of this will bediscussed from a political and practical stance.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:21 - 14:39 GMT
Breakout Room 3

14:21 GMT

Getting it Right with Assistive Technology: Lessons from Research and Practice in Sweden and the UK
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Getting It Right with Assistive Technology: Lessons from Research and Practice in Sweden and the UKJohn RackDirector of Education and PolicyDyslexia Action and Linnaeus Universityjrack@dyslexiaaction.org.ukCo-authors: Johanna Kristensson, Halmstads KommunThe main purpose of this study is to give examples of effective practice and to identify key principles that lie behind successful use of assistive technology for those with literacy and related specific difficulties. This is important because practitioners need to choose good tools and, currently, data and guidance to help do this is scarce.We use a case-study approach, with observations in practice supported by interview and questionnaire data. The three case studies involve: developing reading skills through writing using tablets in First and Second Grade; spelling support for those in middle-school years and; providing reading support in a personalized and an instructional way.The studies support the view that assistive technology should be introduced early and inclusively. It should be seen as a standard tool, thus avoiding a ‘special needs’ image which can be disengaging both for learners and teachers. We argue that the best-designed and best-implemented technology has both an assistive and a skills-development element, and can be used flexibly and easily integrated into wider learning plans and activities. These and other points are illustrated with reference to the case studies and other examples of well-designed software applications.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:21 - 14:39 GMT
Breakout Room 4

14:21 GMT

The Impact of Lexical Factors on Spoken Word Articulation Times (Response Duration) in Word Naming
Limited Capacity seats available

The impact of lexical factors on spoken wordarticulation times (response duration) in wordnamingRob DaviesLancaster Universityr.davies1@lancaster.ac.ukWe examined what factors affect the timing ofspoken responses in reading aloud. Responselatencies are shorter to words that are frequent,learnt early in life, easy to imagine, short andfrom denser orthographic neighbourhoods(Balota et al., 2004). We do not know if theseword attributes affect also the duration ofspoken responses. If we find that attributes likefrequency affect response duration then theoriesabout reading processes (e.g. Coltheart et al.,2001; Seidenberg & McClelland, 1989) shall haveto explain not just response preparation (as theydo now) but also production.We examined the latency (RT) and duration(RD) of spoken responses in reading aloud intwo studies (E1 and E2). The speed at whichresponses can be prepared and produced canbe predicted to vary according to readers’ages or to their reading abilities. Therefore, wetested participants from a wide range of agesand measured participants’ reading ability orphonological awareness. We tested 138 Englishspeakingadults (aged 18-76 years) in E1, and 50adults (aged 22-89 years) in E2. We analyzed theeffects of word and reader attributes on RTs andRDs using linear mixed-effects models.Both spoken response latencies and durationswere affected by individual differences inreading skill as well as by differences amongwords in properties like frequency. Critically,the impact on response timing of word factorswas modulated by individual differences inreading and language skills. We conclude thatcognitive reading processes that determineresponse latency may continue to affectperformance even after response articulationhas begun. Our findings warrant the extensionof theoretical accounts of cognitive readingprocesses to encompass response productionand preparation.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:21 - 14:39 GMT
Breakout Room 2

14:30 GMT

Dyslexia: Recognising & Overcoming Crippling Stressors Inherent in so many Dyslexic Youngsters
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Dyslexia - Recognising & overcoming crippling stressors inherent in so many dyslexic youngstersLindsay PeerEducational Psychologistlindsay@peergordonassociates.co.ukEP assessment over 10 years has shown that self-concept, anxiety, depression and/or anger are frequently present in dyslexic young people, preventing fulfilment of potential - affecting academic, emotional and social development. Understanding why and ways forward will be addressed. We all have important & manageable roles to play in the development of the academic, emotional and social development of dyslexic young people - helping them reach their potential and educators their goals. 

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:30 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 5

14:30 GMT

How to use an Online Corpus for Literacy Instruction: The Secret Tool for Literacy Ninjas
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How to use an online corpus for literacy instruction: The secret tool for literacy ninjas Dominik Lukes Dyslexia Action dlukes@dyslexiaaction.org.ukThe online corpus is probably the most underused tool by the literacy teaching profession. But using a corpus can be of great benefit both for teachers and their learners. This workshop will introduce corpora to teachers and demonstrate how they can use freely accessible tools to create more relevant learning experiences for their students. Bringing the same tools researchers use to the classroom. Participants will understand what an online corpus is and how it can serve as tool in their daily language teaching practice. They will see it as a tool that will save time, engage students and bring evidence-based practices into the classroom.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:30 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 6

14:39 GMT

Dyslexia Executive Functions and Success at Work
Limited Capacity filling up

Dyslexia Executive Functions and Success atWorkCarol LeatherUniversity of Surreyc.leather@surrey.ac.ukCo-authors: Henriette Hogh (Universityof Chichester), Ellen Seiss (University ofBournemouth), John Everatt (University ofCanterbury)For many dyslexic adults, not only literacyproblems impact on their performance at work,but also cognitive difficulties linked to workingmemory and executive functioning. This isnot surprising, as phonological processing isrecognised as part of the working memorysystem and weakness in this area may impacton others. It is the premise of this study thatmetacognitive skills underpin success for dyslexicpeople as they may address these cognitivedifficulties. This paper reports the results of astudy to investigate executive functioning ofdyslexic adults and its role in success at work.A total of 60 dyslexic adults and 30 controlsmatched for age and occupation were assessedon a range of executive functioning measuresincluding inhibition, set shifting and updatingtasks. They also completed questionnairesgathering information about problems withcompleting cognitive tasks and job satisfaction.Literacy-related skills were also assessed.Tests of difference and correlations wereconducted. There were no differences on themeasures of workplace success between thegroups, but there were differences in cognitiveprocessing between the groups and evidenceof weaker set shifting, updating and inhibitionin the dyslexic group. Significant relationshipsbetween planning and work-success were found.Implications for interventions with dyslexicadults and areas of future research will bediscussed. 

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:39 - 14:57 GMT
Breakout Room 3

14:39 GMT

Providing Support to Students with Special Educational Needs and Disability in Polish Mainstream Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

Providing support to students with special educational needs and disability in Polish mainstream schoolsNatalia MalenkoCo-authors: Jolanta Boryszewska, Barbara AdamiakThe State University of Applied Sciences in Lomza (Poland)jboryszewska@pwsip.edu.pl, badamiak@pwsip.edu.pl, nmalenko@pwsip.edu.plThe purpose of the study is to investigate the state of affairs in SEND provision in the Polish educational area from a diachronic perspective. There are many different systems of SEND support in various countries. They all undergo multidimensional changes in the course of their development. The aim of the paper is to collect theoretical and practical experience on the ways of SEND provision up to 2012 through reflections of the teachers who deal with children with SEND before and after on the most essential changes which took place in Poland in 2010. the principle documents which regulate SEND provision in Poland. The paper also comprises a fragment of research which has been carried out on a group of teachers in our region. The teachers were supposed to fill in a specially designed questionnaire whose aim was to learn how they assessed the changes which were introduced into the system of SEND provision in 2010. They were asked how they perceived the changes and their general trajectory.The priority of teachers who work with children with SEND is to help and organize support provision the best they can. Different concepts of SEND provision and changes they undergo very often pose a variety of multiple problems the teachers have to struggle with. The aim of the research is to stay at the forefront of any developments which take place in the area of SEND provision and have all the interested parties like teachers, specialists and parents informed about the current situation in the area. It is not quite clear where all the changes will lead in SEND provision though.The continuation of the research following the change in SEND provision which took place in 2013 has been done, though the outcome has not been described yet.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:39 - 14:57 GMT
Breakout Room 4

14:39 GMT

When does SSD Matter for Literacy? Disordered Errors, Language Status, and Family-Risk of Dyslexia
Limited Capacity seats available

When does SSD matter for literacy? Disorderederrors, language status, and family-risk ofdyslexiaMarianna Hayiou-ThomasUniversity of YorkCo-authors: Dr Julia Carroll (University ofCoventry), Ruth Leavett (University of York),Margaret Snowling (University of Oxford)emma.hayiou-thomas@york.ac.ukSpeech difficulties in early childhood are oftenassociated with poor literacy outcomes, but itis not yet clear how much of the risk is carriedby the presence of SSD itself, and whetherthe association is moderated by other factors.There is evidence pointing to roles for a) thepersistence of speech difficulties to the age atwhich formal reading instruction begins; b) thenature of the speech errors; c) co-occurringlanguage impairment; and d) a family risk ofdyslexia. In the current study, we considerthe role of each of these potential risk factorsin children with early SSD. 68 children wereidentified with SSD at the age of 3½, and theirword-level literacy skills (word-reading, nonwordreading, and spelling) were assessed at the startof formal reading instruction (age 5), and threeyears later (age 8).Speech errors were classified as ‘disordered’  or ‘delayed’, and the severity and persistenceof the SSD were measured. The presenceof a co-occurring language impairment wasalso assessed (on the basis of expressive andreceptive measures of vocabulary and grammar),as was family history of dyslexia. The presenceof early SSD was a small but significant predictorof literacy skills at ages 5 and 8. ‘Disordered’speech errors added to the prediction, but theinitial severity of the SSD, and its persistence toage 5, did not. The presence of a co-occurringlanguage impairment was strongly predictiveof literacy outcomes, and family-risk of dyslexiapredicted additional unique variance. Our resultssupport a role for early SSD in dyslexia, andsuggest that multiple risk factors can accumulateto have serious negative consequences forliteracy development.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:39 - 14:58 GMT
Breakout Room 2

14:57 GMT

An Improved Method of Identifying Individuals with Dyslexia Courtesy of Reverend Bayes
Limited Capacity seats available

An Improved Method of Identifying Individualswith Dyslexia Courtesy of Reverend BayesRichard WagnerFlorida State Universityrkwagner@psy.fsu.eduCurrent approaches to identifying individualswith dyslexia suffer from poor reliability. Aconstellation model that uses Bayes theoremto combine multiple sources of informationcan improve identification and also hasimplications for treatment. Meta-analysis wasused to estimate the strength of relationsbetween dyslexia and criteria includingimpaired phonological processing, impaireddecoding, poor sight word vocabulary, poorreading comprehension relative to listeningcomprehension, family history, and gender.Bayes theorem then was used to estimate theprobability that an individual has dyslexia giventheir values on the criterion values.The results support a constellation modelapproach in which multiple sources ofinformation are combined. Identification ismore reliable when compared to traditionalapproaches. In addition to identifying individualswho need intervention to remediate skill deficits,the model also identifies individuals who couldprofit from assistive technology in the form ofcomputer-based text-to-speech decoders.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:57 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 2

14:57 GMT

The Effectiveness of a Wraparound Support Package for Dyslexic Employees/Employers in the Workplace
Limited Capacity seats available

Implementation of interventions which supportdyslexic trainees and employees in classroomand workplace environmentsMichael StylesPrimary Industry Training Organisation NewZealandCo-authors: Lesley Petersen (PetersenConsulting), Marianne Farrell (Primary ITO)Mike.styles@primaryito.ac.nzThis study examined the effectiveness of specificinterventions to identify and support dyslexictrainees in workplace training and in theirworkplace.New Zealand has a history of inadequate or nonexistentsupport for individuals with dyslexia inthe school setting and beyond. In New Zealandmost people with dyslexia enter the workplacewith no knowledge of their condition. In theNew Zealand context this is ground breakingresearch because little is known about theimpacts of dyslexia in adults in the workplace.Dyslexia is a significant contributor to the wideradult literacy problem.The study evaluated the effectiveness of asupport package based on best internationalpractice and knowledge.The support package had 5 components:1. Screening for dyslexia - using the PearsonDAST.2. Provision of up to date information abouttheir condition.3. Encouragement of dyslexic subjects to accepttheir own condition.4. Educate all parties that come in contact withthe dyslexic person of how best to interactwith the dyslexic subjects.5. Provide appropriate technological andhuman supports for the dyslexic subjects.The study involved semi structured interviewswith 20 trainees, 10 employers of those trainees,5 tutors at off-job training providers, 5 mentorsand 5 Primary ITO training advisors, before,during and after the interventions were put in place. All subjects were from the primary sector (agriculture, horticulture, equine.)The results of this study were qualitative, rather than quantitative. The main outcome has been the initiation of a much greater research project to explore the value of the wrap-around support package across the whole country for industry trainees and tertiary students in a range of sectors. The study confirmed the impact on a society, an economy and an education system of the almost complete lack of infrastructure and support mechanisms to understand and support learners, employees and employers with specific learning difficulties like dyslexia.Specific findings were:1.Technological interventions work, but dyslexic trainees need training to use them.2.Mentors (who act as advocates and coaches) are effective in a workplace setting.3.Poor community understanding of dyslexia impacts on employees, employers, tutors, training advisors. People don’t know what they don’t know.4.Dyslexia screening and quality information about dyslexia is empowering for dyslexic learners, as well as for all those who interact with dyslexic people.5.Giving basic skills to tutors, partners and employers is very empowering for dyslexic learners/employees.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:57 - 15:15 GMT
Breakout Room 3

14:57 GMT

Equity or Advantage
Limited Capacity full
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Equity or Advantage? The effect of receiving access arrangements in university exams on students with specific learning difficulties.Helen DuncanUniversity of Cambridgehd286@cam.ac.ukThe purpose of the study was to identify, through an analysis of actual exam data, the extent to which there is evidence to support the commonly-held belief that the granting of exam access arrangements (use of a word-processor and/or extra time) to students with SpLD confers an advantage. Empirical data was collected from 137 students’ exam scripts in 2014. This sample group consisted of 67 students with SpLD who were granted exam access arrangements and 70 peers who had not disclosed a disability or SpLD and who took the exam under standard conditions. The length of answers on the exam script, marks, classification and grade achieved by students with SpLD were compared with those of the non-disabled students who sat the same exam under standard conditions.Statistical information (such as statistical correlation and differences) was obtained by using SPSS version 22. The statistical conclusion of the data from this study is that candidates with SpLD who were granted the use of a word processor and/or 25% extra time did not perform differently (in terms of total word count, mark and degree classification) than those students who did not disclose a disability and who took the same exam under standard conditions. Therefore, the outcomes of this research project suggests that students with SpLD who use a word-processor and/or extra time in exams are not placed at an advantage by comparison to their non-disabled peers.

Speakers

Saturday March 12, 2016 14:57 - 15:30 GMT
Breakout Room 4

15:15 GMT

Coffee Break and posters
Saturday March 12, 2016 15:15 - 15:45 GMT
Venue

15:45 GMT

Orthographic Learning in Typically and Atypically Developing Children
Abstract: Once children have learnt that words are built up by letters and that letters standfor sounds, they can teach themselves how to read simple words by blending the sounds ofthe letters that make up the words. After a few encounters with a word, the word will be readfluently.Over the last decades, insights have deepened in how Phonological Awareness (PA) and RapidAutomatized Naming (RAN) determine reading and spelling skills. The ability to commit writtenwords to memory and to retrieve this information from memory, so that words can immediatelybe recognised and spelled fluently, however, is relatively under-researched. This ability iscalled Orthographic Learning (OL). Share (1995) has proposed that children teach themselvesto recognise words and to spell them properly through phonological recoding, that is, byapplying letter-sound and sound-letter rules. In addition, he has suggested that the informationcommitted to memory is word-specific, that is, if we attempt to decode the word APPLE a fewtimes, we learn to read and spell APPLE and not the words we have not practised.In the keynote, the current literature on OL will be reviewed, with examples from our ownlab. Then I will present a recently conducted longitudinal study on OL, in which we attempt toanswer the following questions: (1) what is the developmental onset and time course of selfteaching,(2) what is the contribution of self-teaching to reading and spelling ability over andabove phonological memory, vocabulary, rapid naming, and exposure to print, and (3) what isthe relation between orthographic learning and paired associate learning?The keynote will be concluded with an overview of potentially new avenues for research into OL,e.g., to identify the learning mechanism underlying OL.

Chair
Keynote
PV

Professor Victor van Daal

Biography: Victor van Daal joined the research department in the Faculty of Education at EdgeHill University in March 2013. He was awarded his MA in 1982 from the University of Amsterdam and his PhD in 1993 from the Free University Amsterdam.Victor began his professional career as... Read More →


Saturday March 12, 2016 15:45 - 16:30 GMT
Auditorium

16:30 GMT

Closing Session
Saturday March 12, 2016 16:30 - 16:45 GMT
Auditorium

16:45 GMT

Networking
Saturday March 12, 2016 16:45 - 18:45 GMT
Venue

18:15 GMT

Conference Close
Saturday March 12, 2016 18:15 - 18:16 GMT
Venue